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Eckermann, Simon Prof

Senior Professor of Health Economics

  • Faculty of Business
  • Australian Health Services Research Institute

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Simon Eckermann is Senior Professor of Health Economics at the Australian Health Services Research Institute, Sydney Business School and the University of Wollongong. He was previously Health Economics Professor at the Flinders University Centre for Clinical Change and Health Care Research and Senior Health Economist at the NHMRC Clinical Trial Centre. He  is a CI on competitive research grants totalling more than A$30 million since 2005 and actively sits on and undertakes guideline revision and health economics educational activities for National decision bodies including the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee Economic Sub-Committee (PBAC ESC 2005-2010), National Palliative Care Trials Scientific Committee (2006-2014), Prostheses List Advisory Committee (2012-2014), Victorian Cancer Agency (2015-) and Food Standards ANZ (2017-) as well as various NHMRC grant review committees and the Editorial Board of Medical Decision Making (2018-).

    His original research and collaborations have established missing links between optimal decision making in research, reimbursement and regulation in practice and are extensively published in the highest impact health economics and decision making Journals, and clinical and policy journals with his applied research. Related principles and methods have been taught by Professor Eckermann to more than 600 students from a wide range of clinical, research, policy and health technology assessment backgrounds since 2000, with the ‘Health Economics from Theory to Practice’ course he established with Professor Willan in 2005 rated by participants  as the best course of its type internationally since being run at Oxford University in 2009.

    Senior Professor Eckermann leads international health economic research for robust evaluation in trial and practice setting with net benefit correspondence theorem methods he developed and optimal research design with value of Information methods. These methods have increasingly been extensively published in major International Journals, but most importantly in the past 5 years brought together into the Health Economics from Theory to Practice text (Eckermann 2017) where across 13 chapters these methods have been integrated and extended to allow optimal joint decision making across joint research, reimbursement and regulatory decision making.   

    Over the past 5 years Professor Eckermann has extended his internationally recognised research identifying robust health economic methods for health care evaluation in trial and practice settings into robust methods across health promotion and prevention, palliative care, aged care and across health system settings more broadly. This has also extended to key policy related research on successful ageing and health and aged care reform, health system policies in primary care and to evaluation of integrated movement and environmental strategies.

Member Of


Attended Event


Selected Publications


Investigator On


Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Colonoscopic Screening in People at Increased Risk of Bowel Cancer: A Longitudinal Study King, Denis

Keywords


  • Expected net loss curves and frontiers providing best summary measures for optimising joint research, reimbursement and regulatory decision making under uncertainty
  • Health Economics of Ageing
  • Health promotion evaluation of strategies in community settings with network multiplier effects
  • Net benefit correspondence theorem methods for optimal multiple strategy and multiple dimension cost effectiveness analysis and technology assessment
  • Net benefit correspondence theorem methods for  including quality variables in efficiency measurement consistent with maximising net benefit
  • Robust odds ratio methods for binary outcomes (e.g. success vs failure) that overcome relative risk fallacies with alternative binary outcome framing to enable consistent evidence synthesis and translation
  • Value of Information methods for optimised joint research and reimbursement decisions
  • evaluating environmental health promotion strategies in communities across the lifecycle

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Simon Eckermann is Senior Professor of Health Economics at the Australian Health Services Research Institute, Sydney Business School and the University of Wollongong. He was previously Health Economics Professor at the Flinders University Centre for Clinical Change and Health Care Research and Senior Health Economist at the NHMRC Clinical Trial Centre. He  is a CI on competitive research grants totalling more than A$30 million since 2005 and actively sits on and undertakes guideline revision and health economics educational activities for National decision bodies including the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee Economic Sub-Committee (PBAC ESC 2005-2010), National Palliative Care Trials Scientific Committee (2006-2014), Prostheses List Advisory Committee (2012-2014), Victorian Cancer Agency (2015-) and Food Standards ANZ (2017-) as well as various NHMRC grant review committees and the Editorial Board of Medical Decision Making (2018-).

    His original research and collaborations have established missing links between optimal decision making in research, reimbursement and regulation in practice and are extensively published in the highest impact health economics and decision making Journals, and clinical and policy journals with his applied research. Related principles and methods have been taught by Professor Eckermann to more than 600 students from a wide range of clinical, research, policy and health technology assessment backgrounds since 2000, with the ‘Health Economics from Theory to Practice’ course he established with Professor Willan in 2005 rated by participants  as the best course of its type internationally since being run at Oxford University in 2009.

    Senior Professor Eckermann leads international health economic research for robust evaluation in trial and practice setting with net benefit correspondence theorem methods he developed and optimal research design with value of Information methods. These methods have increasingly been extensively published in major International Journals, but most importantly in the past 5 years brought together into the Health Economics from Theory to Practice text (Eckermann 2017) where across 13 chapters these methods have been integrated and extended to allow optimal joint decision making across joint research, reimbursement and regulatory decision making.   

    Over the past 5 years Professor Eckermann has extended his internationally recognised research identifying robust health economic methods for health care evaluation in trial and practice settings into robust methods across health promotion and prevention, palliative care, aged care and across health system settings more broadly. This has also extended to key policy related research on successful ageing and health and aged care reform, health system policies in primary care and to evaluation of integrated movement and environmental strategies.

Member Of


Attended Event


Selected Publications


Investigator On


Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Colonoscopic Screening in People at Increased Risk of Bowel Cancer: A Longitudinal Study King, Denis

Keywords


  • Expected net loss curves and frontiers providing best summary measures for optimising joint research, reimbursement and regulatory decision making under uncertainty
  • Health Economics of Ageing
  • Health promotion evaluation of strategies in community settings with network multiplier effects
  • Net benefit correspondence theorem methods for optimal multiple strategy and multiple dimension cost effectiveness analysis and technology assessment
  • Net benefit correspondence theorem methods for  including quality variables in efficiency measurement consistent with maximising net benefit
  • Robust odds ratio methods for binary outcomes (e.g. success vs failure) that overcome relative risk fallacies with alternative binary outcome framing to enable consistent evidence synthesis and translation
  • Value of Information methods for optimised joint research and reimbursement decisions
  • evaluating environmental health promotion strategies in communities across the lifecycle
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