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Yang, Shu-qing Assoc. Professor

Assoc. Prof. Assoc. Prof.

  • School of Civil, Mining & Environmental Engineering
  • Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences
  • GeoQuEST Research Centre

Overview


Dr. Yang has been involved in the study of sediment transport and hydraulics for almost 20 years. From 1988-1994, he engaged in large scale physical model studies of sediment transport in Three-Gorge Reservoir (one of the largest reservoirs in the world). From 1999-2005, he had the chances to study experimentally the sediment transport in Singapore strait and Singapore's beach evolution using physical model. After 2003, Dr. Yang has shifted his research works from experimental study to theoretical study.

Selected Publications


Potential Supervision Topics


  • Coastal reservoirs and their potential for efficient water management in the lower Murray-Darling river basin.

    The Murray-Darling river basin is the largest and most economically valuable river system in Australia. However, historic over-allocation of water, questionable management in the past and the deterioration of the Basins’ ecosystem has resulted in what is arguably Australia’s largest ever environment restoration project to reduce overall extractions, improve irrigation water use efficiency at a landscape scale, and reallocate water from the consumptive pool for environmental flows. This research aims to quantitatively describe a ‘best’ solution for environmental flows, water quality and agricultural output in the lower Murray system. The project will examine and model options for shifting the focus of water management from upstream to downstream through the construction of a small size (580GL) coastal reservoir inside the Lower Lakes in the mouth of Murray River. This ‘end-of-system’ approach will have a focus on security of Adelaide’s water supply and maximising the efficient use of flows arriving from upstream (northern) catchments. The efficacy of such a system for separating high-quality river water to secure Adelaide’s water supply, from lower quality water in the Lower Lakes outside of the reservoir for agricultural purposes surrounding the lakes will be assessed. Different scenarios will be modelled to describe the relationship between environmental flows, urban water availability and agricultural output, under both historical and likely climate change effects. The optimal economic radius for water pumping from the lower lakes will be determined including potential new irrigation areas associated with the coastal reservoir.

    Coastal Reservoirs for Melbourne’s water supply

    Melbourne is Australia’s secondary largest city with population of 4 million in 2000s, with its population projected to be 8 million in 2050. During the Millennium Drought (2000-2010), Melbourne’s dams fell to only 26% of its full capacity. A close look at its water supply reveals that its total 10 dams are located some distance upstream, in mountainous regions, where they capture runoff from only part of each river basin (i.e., 1,570km2 only, relative to Yarra total catchment 4,078km2). The discrepancy in the locations of water storage and population centres exacerbates the water crisis and storing water upstream can reduce downstream environmental flows. In addition, the existing inland reservoirs are ageing and silting up, contributing to a loss of storage. This project will investigate and model the feasibility of coastal reservoirs for rivers and streams within 150km of Melbourne, with a focus on cost-effective options for a Singapore-style coastal reservoir on the Yarra River.

    Coastal Reservoirs for inter-basin water diversion and its application in Persian Gulf.

    The total production capacity of desalination plants in the Persian Gulf is about 13km3/year, which is essential for maintenance of current human populations and communities; it is likely as well that this capacity will increase in future. There is evidence that the brine discharge from these plants has resulted in significant environmental impacts on local marine ecosystems. A private sector UAE company has recently announced an ambitious project to tow an iceberg from the South Pole, over a distance of around 1,2600km, to augment the country’s water supply. This project will investigate the engineering and economic benefits and costs of an alternative solution: by construction of coastal reservoirs along the Arabian Sea and the Persian Gulf to capture, store and develop runoff that would otherwise be lost to the sea, with these reservoirs linked by a pipeline network. For example, India every year discharges 220km3/year of water into the Arabian sea, but the theoretical distance from an Indian coastal reservoir to the UAE is only 2000km while China has done a similar project over 1500km. (https://www.arabianbusiness.com/culture-society/399776-uae-company-plans-to-tow-iceberg-from-antarctica-by-2020). The project will investigate the feasibility of a network of coastal reservoirs in the Persian Gulf relative to other options including capture and use of icebergs.

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Master of Philosophy Wetland treatment system to supplement Shanghai's water supply Kelly, Samuel
    Doctor of Philosophy Oceanographic Characteristics of Alluvial Estuaries, North-West Arabian/Persian Gulf Al-aesawi, Qassim
    Doctor of Philosophy Turbulent structures and Drag Force in vegetated open channel flows under Different vegetation configurations Miguntanna, Nadeeka
    Master of Philosophy BLAST OPTIMISATION OF NORTHPARKES E26 SLC Hawkins, Ellie
    Doctor of Philosophy Numerical Study of Brisbane River Estuary and Moreton Bay, Australia: Proposed Coastal Reservoir for Water Resource Development and Flood Adaptation/Mitigation Khalil, Usman
    Doctor of Philosophy Particle entrainment mechanics near bed in open channel turbulent flows Riaz, Muhammad Zain Bin

Keywords


  • sediment transport, coastal reservoirs, water resources engineering, turbulence

Selected Publications


Potential Supervision Topics


  • Coastal reservoirs and their potential for efficient water management in the lower Murray-Darling river basin.

    The Murray-Darling river basin is the largest and most economically valuable river system in Australia. However, historic over-allocation of water, questionable management in the past and the deterioration of the Basins’ ecosystem has resulted in what is arguably Australia’s largest ever environment restoration project to reduce overall extractions, improve irrigation water use efficiency at a landscape scale, and reallocate water from the consumptive pool for environmental flows. This research aims to quantitatively describe a ‘best’ solution for environmental flows, water quality and agricultural output in the lower Murray system. The project will examine and model options for shifting the focus of water management from upstream to downstream through the construction of a small size (580GL) coastal reservoir inside the Lower Lakes in the mouth of Murray River. This ‘end-of-system’ approach will have a focus on security of Adelaide’s water supply and maximising the efficient use of flows arriving from upstream (northern) catchments. The efficacy of such a system for separating high-quality river water to secure Adelaide’s water supply, from lower quality water in the Lower Lakes outside of the reservoir for agricultural purposes surrounding the lakes will be assessed. Different scenarios will be modelled to describe the relationship between environmental flows, urban water availability and agricultural output, under both historical and likely climate change effects. The optimal economic radius for water pumping from the lower lakes will be determined including potential new irrigation areas associated with the coastal reservoir.

    Coastal Reservoirs for Melbourne’s water supply

    Melbourne is Australia’s secondary largest city with population of 4 million in 2000s, with its population projected to be 8 million in 2050. During the Millennium Drought (2000-2010), Melbourne’s dams fell to only 26% of its full capacity. A close look at its water supply reveals that its total 10 dams are located some distance upstream, in mountainous regions, where they capture runoff from only part of each river basin (i.e., 1,570km2 only, relative to Yarra total catchment 4,078km2). The discrepancy in the locations of water storage and population centres exacerbates the water crisis and storing water upstream can reduce downstream environmental flows. In addition, the existing inland reservoirs are ageing and silting up, contributing to a loss of storage. This project will investigate and model the feasibility of coastal reservoirs for rivers and streams within 150km of Melbourne, with a focus on cost-effective options for a Singapore-style coastal reservoir on the Yarra River.

    Coastal Reservoirs for inter-basin water diversion and its application in Persian Gulf.

    The total production capacity of desalination plants in the Persian Gulf is about 13km3/year, which is essential for maintenance of current human populations and communities; it is likely as well that this capacity will increase in future. There is evidence that the brine discharge from these plants has resulted in significant environmental impacts on local marine ecosystems. A private sector UAE company has recently announced an ambitious project to tow an iceberg from the South Pole, over a distance of around 1,2600km, to augment the country’s water supply. This project will investigate the engineering and economic benefits and costs of an alternative solution: by construction of coastal reservoirs along the Arabian Sea and the Persian Gulf to capture, store and develop runoff that would otherwise be lost to the sea, with these reservoirs linked by a pipeline network. For example, India every year discharges 220km3/year of water into the Arabian sea, but the theoretical distance from an Indian coastal reservoir to the UAE is only 2000km while China has done a similar project over 1500km. (https://www.arabianbusiness.com/culture-society/399776-uae-company-plans-to-tow-iceberg-from-antarctica-by-2020). The project will investigate the feasibility of a network of coastal reservoirs in the Persian Gulf relative to other options including capture and use of icebergs.

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Master of Philosophy Wetland treatment system to supplement Shanghai's water supply Kelly, Samuel
    Doctor of Philosophy Oceanographic Characteristics of Alluvial Estuaries, North-West Arabian/Persian Gulf Al-aesawi, Qassim
    Doctor of Philosophy Turbulent structures and Drag Force in vegetated open channel flows under Different vegetation configurations Miguntanna, Nadeeka
    Master of Philosophy BLAST OPTIMISATION OF NORTHPARKES E26 SLC Hawkins, Ellie
    Doctor of Philosophy Numerical Study of Brisbane River Estuary and Moreton Bay, Australia: Proposed Coastal Reservoir for Water Resource Development and Flood Adaptation/Mitigation Khalil, Usman
    Doctor of Philosophy Particle entrainment mechanics near bed in open channel turbulent flows Riaz, Muhammad Zain Bin

Keywords


  • sediment transport, coastal reservoirs, water resources engineering, turbulence
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