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Quah, Ee Ling Dr

Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Education Leader of School of Humanities and Social Inquiry

  • Chair - UOW Ally Network 2018 - 2022

Overview


Dr Quah Ee Ling Sharon (she/her) is a Singaporean-Chinese queer migrant woman senior lecturer in Sociology. Her surname is Quah and given name is Ee Ling. The correct order of her name is surname first, followed by given names.

Ee Ling is a transnational, intersectional feminist sociologist. She developed her own brand of feminism - fire dragon feminism (see epilogue of her latest book). 

After being conferred PhD in Sociology by The University of Sydney in 2013, Ee Ling was awarded a highly competitive postdoctoral fellowship and a subsequent research fellowship by the National University of Singapore, Asia Research Institute. During her fellowships, she published her first sole-authored book, Perspectives on Marital Dissolution: Divorce Biographies in Singapore (2015, Springer). In 2016, she completed a study on transnational divorces in Singapore as the Chief Investigator with a national research grant awarded by the Singapore Government. Based on this project’s findings, she published her second book, Transnational Divorce: Understanding Intimacies and Inequalities from Singapore (2020, Routledge). She has also published her research in Journal of Family Issues, Journal of Ethnic and Migration StudiesEmotion, Space and SocietyJournal of Sociology, Marriage and Family Review, and Australian Feminist Studies.

Ee Ling's research draws from decolonial, transnational and intersectional feminist perspectives and centres round community-based research, inequalities and social justice. Ee Ling is currently working on two community based research projects: 1. UOW Community Engagement Grant project - Understanding diversity service workers' knowledge and skills gap in servicing culturally diverse LGBTIQ+ communities in the context of COVID-19; 2. Southeast Asian Queer Migration Biographies. 

At UOW School of Humanities and Social Inquiry, Ee Ling is the newly appointed Education Leader responsible for representing the School at Faculty Education Committee on Curriculum Management. Ee Ling teaches Introduction to Sociology, Genders & Sexualities, and Race, Migration & Diversity. Ee Ling is committed to the work of decolonising academia, research and curriculum. She is leading a UOW Jindaola Grant learning & teaching project to decolonise humanities and social inquiry curriculum by placing importance on Indigenous knowledges. 

Ee Ling is the recipient of Vice Chancellor's Rosemary Cooper Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Award in 2020. She is the Chair of UOW Ally Network, a committee member of UOW Forging United Safe Environments Network (anti-racism), a faculty representative member of Academic Senate, and a member of UOW Workforce Diversity Reference group, Feminist Research Network, Centre for Critical Human Rights Research and Technology, Migration and Displacement. 

Outside of the academy, she serves as the board director of SheQu (a non-profit organisation reaching out to LBTIQ+ women from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Research profile
    For the past ten years, Ee Ling has been researching the topic of divorce, specifically how heteronormative structures impact non-mainstream families, and how these families reconfigure their family arrangements, develop discursive and practical strategies, and redefine the meanings of family. In her first book, Perspectives on Marital Dissolution: Divorce biographies in Singapore, she engages with bodies of sociological literature on individualisation, personal communities, intimacies and divorce to develop an innovative theoretical framework of divorce biography to explain non-linear, non-standardised  divorce experiences within the contexts they were located in. Her research has opened up spaces where she engages in meaningful dialogues and research partnerships with international scholars from multiple disciplines and local community stakeholders including NGOs and government departments. Her research has been used for policy and service review by the Singapore Government. 

    In her second book, Transnational Divorce: Understanding Intimacies and Inequalities from Singapore, she employs a transnational, intersectional feminist perspective to extend the earlier conceptualisation of divorce biography to suggest a new framework of transnational divorce biography. In this new conceptual framework, she provides readers a useful analytical tool to make sense of transnational divorced individuals’ messy experiences in working out their transborder intimacy practices. The book is essentially a feminist project aimed at exposing and challenging taken for granted, seemingly neutral and tightly interlocked structures of privileges and inequalities. It ends with an epilogue on fire dragon feminism where the author launches her brand of feminism. She shares with readers her use of fire dragon feminist superpowers in developing place-based feminist tools of activism and resistance, and her mission in reflecting on complicity and responsibilities, blowing flames at oppressive structures, and redirecting traffic.


    Research Interests
    • Transnational, intersectional feminist perspectives
    • Decoloniality
    • Non-normative and queer families, critiques of heteronormativity
    • Divorce, transnational divorce
    • Migration
    • Genders, masculinities,
    • Sexualities
    • Queer theory
    • Intimacies
    • Emotions
    • Inequalities, social justice
    • Social policy

    Current Research Projects
    Diversity, equality and social justice at the workplace
    Decolonising and indigenising the curriculum
    Decolonising research methodologies 
    Queer migration

Available as Research Supervisor

Available for Collaborative Projects

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • My research on divorce focuses on understanding how divorced individuals and families work out their post-divorce trajectories in areas concerning legal proceedings, child custody and access, finances, housing, work, family relationships, friendships, emotions and well being. Using sociological perspectives, I develop a theoretical framework of 'divorce biography' to make sense of research findings generated from in-depth interviews with divorcees in Singapore and Australia. This theory development aims to challenge negative perceptions and attitudes towards non-normative families and provide a critique of heteronormativity. Publications such as my sole-authored monograph, "Perspectives on Marital Dissolution: Divorce Biographies in Singapore'' (Springer 2015) and book chapters, "Cross-cultural families in Singapore: transnational marriages and divorces" and "Divorced and never married mothers in Singapore: practices, challenges and strategies" (Routledge 2018) arising from my projects have been used by policy makers and practitioners for policy and service review in Singapore.

Available as Research Supervisor

Potential Supervision Topics


    • Families and personal relationships
    • Divorce and other non-normative family arrangements
    • Emotions and intimacies
    • Transnational divorce and families
    • Genders and sexualities
    • State and social policy
    • Decolonising research and curriculum
    • Race, ethnicity and diversity

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Factors influencing the development of Pragmatic Competence of Chinese Learners of English Language Wang, Qiong

Outreach Overview


  • Chair of UOW Ally Network
    Member of UOW Ally Network Advisory Committee
    Member of UOW Safe and Respectful Communities Working Party
    Member of UOW Workforce Diversity Reference Group
    Member, UOW Forging United Safe Environments Network
    Member, Feminist Research Network
    Member, Centre for Critical Human Rights Research

Education And Training


  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology, University of Sydney, Department of Sociology and Social Policy, PhD in Sociology. Thesis: 'Far from crippling': Divorce, individualisation and personal communities 2008 - 2013
  • National University of Singapore, Department of Sociology, Master of Social Science (Applied Sociology) 2001 - 2002
  • National University of Singapore, Department of Chinese Studies, BA (Chinese Studies and Chinese Language) 1995 - 1998

Teaching Overview


  • Subject Coordinator of SOC103 Introduction to Sociology

    Subject Coordinator of SOC227 Genders and Sexualities

Full Name


  • Dr Quah Ee Ling Sharon

Mailing Address


  • University of Wollongong

    Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts, Building 19 Room 2011

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Research profile
    For the past ten years, Ee Ling has been researching the topic of divorce, specifically how heteronormative structures impact non-mainstream families, and how these families reconfigure their family arrangements, develop discursive and practical strategies, and redefine the meanings of family. In her first book, Perspectives on Marital Dissolution: Divorce biographies in Singapore, she engages with bodies of sociological literature on individualisation, personal communities, intimacies and divorce to develop an innovative theoretical framework of divorce biography to explain non-linear, non-standardised  divorce experiences within the contexts they were located in. Her research has opened up spaces where she engages in meaningful dialogues and research partnerships with international scholars from multiple disciplines and local community stakeholders including NGOs and government departments. Her research has been used for policy and service review by the Singapore Government. 

    In her second book, Transnational Divorce: Understanding Intimacies and Inequalities from Singapore, she employs a transnational, intersectional feminist perspective to extend the earlier conceptualisation of divorce biography to suggest a new framework of transnational divorce biography. In this new conceptual framework, she provides readers a useful analytical tool to make sense of transnational divorced individuals’ messy experiences in working out their transborder intimacy practices. The book is essentially a feminist project aimed at exposing and challenging taken for granted, seemingly neutral and tightly interlocked structures of privileges and inequalities. It ends with an epilogue on fire dragon feminism where the author launches her brand of feminism. She shares with readers her use of fire dragon feminist superpowers in developing place-based feminist tools of activism and resistance, and her mission in reflecting on complicity and responsibilities, blowing flames at oppressive structures, and redirecting traffic.


    Research Interests
    • Transnational, intersectional feminist perspectives
    • Decoloniality
    • Non-normative and queer families, critiques of heteronormativity
    • Divorce, transnational divorce
    • Migration
    • Genders, masculinities,
    • Sexualities
    • Queer theory
    • Intimacies
    • Emotions
    • Inequalities, social justice
    • Social policy

    Current Research Projects
    Diversity, equality and social justice at the workplace
    Decolonising and indigenising the curriculum
    Decolonising research methodologies 
    Queer migration

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • My research on divorce focuses on understanding how divorced individuals and families work out their post-divorce trajectories in areas concerning legal proceedings, child custody and access, finances, housing, work, family relationships, friendships, emotions and well being. Using sociological perspectives, I develop a theoretical framework of 'divorce biography' to make sense of research findings generated from in-depth interviews with divorcees in Singapore and Australia. This theory development aims to challenge negative perceptions and attitudes towards non-normative families and provide a critique of heteronormativity. Publications such as my sole-authored monograph, "Perspectives on Marital Dissolution: Divorce Biographies in Singapore'' (Springer 2015) and book chapters, "Cross-cultural families in Singapore: transnational marriages and divorces" and "Divorced and never married mothers in Singapore: practices, challenges and strategies" (Routledge 2018) arising from my projects have been used by policy makers and practitioners for policy and service review in Singapore.

Potential Supervision Topics


    • Families and personal relationships
    • Divorce and other non-normative family arrangements
    • Emotions and intimacies
    • Transnational divorce and families
    • Genders and sexualities
    • State and social policy
    • Decolonising research and curriculum
    • Race, ethnicity and diversity

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Factors influencing the development of Pragmatic Competence of Chinese Learners of English Language Wang, Qiong

Outreach Overview


  • Chair of UOW Ally Network
    Member of UOW Ally Network Advisory Committee
    Member of UOW Safe and Respectful Communities Working Party
    Member of UOW Workforce Diversity Reference Group
    Member, UOW Forging United Safe Environments Network
    Member, Feminist Research Network
    Member, Centre for Critical Human Rights Research

Education And Training


  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology, University of Sydney, Department of Sociology and Social Policy, PhD in Sociology. Thesis: 'Far from crippling': Divorce, individualisation and personal communities 2008 - 2013
  • National University of Singapore, Department of Sociology, Master of Social Science (Applied Sociology) 2001 - 2002
  • National University of Singapore, Department of Chinese Studies, BA (Chinese Studies and Chinese Language) 1995 - 1998

Teaching Overview


  • Subject Coordinator of SOC103 Introduction to Sociology

    Subject Coordinator of SOC227 Genders and Sexualities

Full Name


  • Dr Quah Ee Ling Sharon

Mailing Address


  • University of Wollongong

    Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts, Building 19 Room 2011

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

Geographic Focus