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Ogie, Robert Dr.

UOW PERL Fellow

  • Primary Group - SMART Infrastructure Facility
  • Primary Group - SMART Infrastructure Facility
  • Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences

Overview


Dr Ogie has an educational background in Engineering and Information Technology (IT). IT has a crucial role in helping humans address some of the most challenging problems of the 21st century, including climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction. Dr Ogie’s core field of research is Applied Computing, where he focuses on designing or applying technologies such as crowdsourcing tools, mobile/web applications, social media, artificial intelligence (AI), cloud computing, internet of things (IoT), and other emerging technologies to address real-world problems. Dr Ogie was a key investigator for the PetaJakarta.org project, which explored crowdsourced Twitter data for real-time flood mapping in the city of Jakarta, Indonesia. He led the #RecoverSouthCoast project to investigate the role of social media in supporting recovery from the Black Summer bushfires in the Australian South Coast. Dr Ogie is a recipient of the Illawarra Multicultural Awards 2020, with his project, EmerCALD, winning the Community Innovation Award for working with 450 community members across seven language groups, local organisations, and the State Emergency Service (SES) to improve emergency communication with culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities during natural disasters.

Available as Research Supervisor

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • <p>PetaJakarta.org (Map Jakarta) was the result of a world-first Joint Pilot Study initiated by researchers at the SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong (UOW), in collaboration with the Jakarta Emergency Management Agency (BPBD DKI) and social media giant Twitter. Jakarta is regularly devastated by flooding during the annual monsoon. The infrastructure of this dense metropolis tends to <a href="http://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2015/11/05/how-to-draw-a-city-the-basics/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lag behind its rate of growth</a>, making it vulnerable to natural disasters such as severe, city-wide flooding.</p><p>Citizens had constantly criticised Jakarta’s Government Emergency Management Agency for their slow responses to natural disasters. As the tenth largest city in the world and with one of the highest numbers of Twitter users on the planet, there was an opportunity for this social media platform to play a significant role in flood management in Jakarta.</p><p>For the first time, PetaJakarta.org empowered Jakarta citizens who know flooding in their locale the best, to actively report to government, enabling greater information sharing and data coordination among citizens and government agencies; this had, although long been desired, never ever possible before. Citizens of Jakarta could identify locations of flooding in real-time, helping them safely navigate the city. The novel technical solution has fostered equitable and collaborative adaptability and resilience to increasing environmental disasters with climate change.</p>

Available as Research Supervisor

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) Understanding Patients Perceptions of Social Support Features on Social Media and its Effects on Behavior Change Basahal, Suliman

Keywords


  • Crisis/disaster informatics, IT-enabled citizen engagement in disaster response, Graph-based network modelling and analysis of Infrastructure systems, Quantitative approaches of assessing infrastructure resilience and vulnerabilities

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • <p>PetaJakarta.org (Map Jakarta) was the result of a world-first Joint Pilot Study initiated by researchers at the SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong (UOW), in collaboration with the Jakarta Emergency Management Agency (BPBD DKI) and social media giant Twitter. Jakarta is regularly devastated by flooding during the annual monsoon. The infrastructure of this dense metropolis tends to <a href="http://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2015/11/05/how-to-draw-a-city-the-basics/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lag behind its rate of growth</a>, making it vulnerable to natural disasters such as severe, city-wide flooding.</p><p>Citizens had constantly criticised Jakarta’s Government Emergency Management Agency for their slow responses to natural disasters. As the tenth largest city in the world and with one of the highest numbers of Twitter users on the planet, there was an opportunity for this social media platform to play a significant role in flood management in Jakarta.</p><p>For the first time, PetaJakarta.org empowered Jakarta citizens who know flooding in their locale the best, to actively report to government, enabling greater information sharing and data coordination among citizens and government agencies; this had, although long been desired, never ever possible before. Citizens of Jakarta could identify locations of flooding in real-time, helping them safely navigate the city. The novel technical solution has fostered equitable and collaborative adaptability and resilience to increasing environmental disasters with climate change.</p>

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) Understanding Patients Perceptions of Social Support Features on Social Media and its Effects on Behavior Change Basahal, Suliman

Keywords


  • Crisis/disaster informatics, IT-enabled citizen engagement in disaster response, Graph-based network modelling and analysis of Infrastructure systems, Quantitative approaches of assessing infrastructure resilience and vulnerabilities

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