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Teaching delirium to undergraduate medical students: Exploring the effects of a cross-professional group objective structured clinical examination compared to standard education

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Objectives: To compare a cross-professional facilitated delirium group objective structured clinical examination (GOSCE) educational intervention with standard delirium education for medical students during clinical placement, and explore the differences in the examiner's written feedback between the two groups. Methods: A non-randomised clustered controlled designed study at a single metropolitan university across several campuses in Sydney, Australia. A convenience sample of third-year medical students was recruited. Students' knowledge, communication, and clinical reasoning skills were assessed using a delirium case mock OSCE at the end of the academic year. The OSCE marks and the examiner's feedback for the intervention and control group were compared. Results: The intervention group (n��=��41) had a higher total mean OSCE mark compared to the control group (n��=��29) (36.5, SD 2.9 vs. 33.7, SD 2.9, p < 0.001). Content analysis of the examiner's feedback showed the intervention group had a greater understanding of the need for forward planning and future cognitive assessments, and the roles of the interdisciplinary team in delirium care. Conclusions: The innovative cross-professional facilitated delirium GOSCE education was effective in increasing delirium knowledge, communication, and clinical reasoning skills compared to conventional education for medical students during clinical placement. Further studies are needed to investigate how this is translated into practice.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Montgomery, A., Baird, L., Traynor, V., Chang, H. C., & Smerdely, P. (2022). Teaching delirium to undergraduate medical students: Exploring the effects of a cross-professional group objective structured clinical examination compared to standard education. Australasian Journal on Ageing. doi:10.1111/ajag.13144

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85141354777

Volume


Issue


Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Objectives: To compare a cross-professional facilitated delirium group objective structured clinical examination (GOSCE) educational intervention with standard delirium education for medical students during clinical placement, and explore the differences in the examiner's written feedback between the two groups. Methods: A non-randomised clustered controlled designed study at a single metropolitan university across several campuses in Sydney, Australia. A convenience sample of third-year medical students was recruited. Students' knowledge, communication, and clinical reasoning skills were assessed using a delirium case mock OSCE at the end of the academic year. The OSCE marks and the examiner's feedback for the intervention and control group were compared. Results: The intervention group (n��=��41) had a higher total mean OSCE mark compared to the control group (n��=��29) (36.5, SD 2.9 vs. 33.7, SD 2.9, p < 0.001). Content analysis of the examiner's feedback showed the intervention group had a greater understanding of the need for forward planning and future cognitive assessments, and the roles of the interdisciplinary team in delirium care. Conclusions: The innovative cross-professional facilitated delirium GOSCE education was effective in increasing delirium knowledge, communication, and clinical reasoning skills compared to conventional education for medical students during clinical placement. Further studies are needed to investigate how this is translated into practice.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Montgomery, A., Baird, L., Traynor, V., Chang, H. C., & Smerdely, P. (2022). Teaching delirium to undergraduate medical students: Exploring the effects of a cross-professional group objective structured clinical examination compared to standard education. Australasian Journal on Ageing. doi:10.1111/ajag.13144

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85141354777

Volume


Issue


Place Of Publication