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Wake up and smell the alpha-diketones! Could coffee roasting be harmful to workers?

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione are alpha-diketones that are generated during the coffee

    roasting process and have been shown to be related to respiratory symptoms, abnormal lung

    function, and in rare cases, an irreversible disease called obliterative bronchiolitis. This study

    measured personal exposures in a coffee roastery in New Zealand using a novel method

    involving thermal desorption tubes, and explored the prevalence of respiratory symptoms with

    a health questionnaire.

    Exposures from task samples were highest for grinding (GM: 22.5 ppb diacetyl; GM: 19.3

    ppb 2,3-pentanedione), followed by packaging (GM: 10.8 ppb diacetyl; GM: 9.3 ppb

    2,3-pentanedione) and then roasting (GM: 4.7 ppb diacetyl; GM: 4.1 ppb diacetyl). 8h-TWA

    diacetyl exposures exceeded the NIOSH REL of 5 ppb for Roaster/Packager (GM: 6.6 ppb)

    and Grinder (GM: 5.3 ppb). 8h-TWA concentrations were below the NIOSH REL of 9.3 ppb for

    2,3-pentanedione (Roaster/Packager, GM: 5.7 ppb; Grinder, GM: 4.6 ppb). Workers reported

    nose, eye symptoms and systemic symptoms (flu-like illness or achy joints, fever or chills, or

    unusual tiredness or fatigue).

    This study is believed to be the first to measure personal exposure to alpha-diketones in New

    Zealand coffee processing workers. Exposure to diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione is a potential

    occupational health hazard that the New Zealand coffee processing industry should be made

    aware of. Further research into alpha-diketone exposure and health effects, and control

    measures to minimise risks to health are recommended.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Cheung, K., Whitelaw, J., & Apthorpe, L. (2022, March 19). Wake up and smell the alpha-diketones! Could coffee roasting be harmful to workers?. In Australian Institute of Occupational Hygienists Inc 38th Annual Conference & Exhibition (pp. 36). Victoria, Australia: AIOH.

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 36

End Page


  • 36

Place Of Publication


  • Victoria, Australia

Abstract


  • Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione are alpha-diketones that are generated during the coffee

    roasting process and have been shown to be related to respiratory symptoms, abnormal lung

    function, and in rare cases, an irreversible disease called obliterative bronchiolitis. This study

    measured personal exposures in a coffee roastery in New Zealand using a novel method

    involving thermal desorption tubes, and explored the prevalence of respiratory symptoms with

    a health questionnaire.

    Exposures from task samples were highest for grinding (GM: 22.5 ppb diacetyl; GM: 19.3

    ppb 2,3-pentanedione), followed by packaging (GM: 10.8 ppb diacetyl; GM: 9.3 ppb

    2,3-pentanedione) and then roasting (GM: 4.7 ppb diacetyl; GM: 4.1 ppb diacetyl). 8h-TWA

    diacetyl exposures exceeded the NIOSH REL of 5 ppb for Roaster/Packager (GM: 6.6 ppb)

    and Grinder (GM: 5.3 ppb). 8h-TWA concentrations were below the NIOSH REL of 9.3 ppb for

    2,3-pentanedione (Roaster/Packager, GM: 5.7 ppb; Grinder, GM: 4.6 ppb). Workers reported

    nose, eye symptoms and systemic symptoms (flu-like illness or achy joints, fever or chills, or

    unusual tiredness or fatigue).

    This study is believed to be the first to measure personal exposure to alpha-diketones in New

    Zealand coffee processing workers. Exposure to diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione is a potential

    occupational health hazard that the New Zealand coffee processing industry should be made

    aware of. Further research into alpha-diketone exposure and health effects, and control

    measures to minimise risks to health are recommended.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Cheung, K., Whitelaw, J., & Apthorpe, L. (2022, March 19). Wake up and smell the alpha-diketones! Could coffee roasting be harmful to workers?. In Australian Institute of Occupational Hygienists Inc 38th Annual Conference & Exhibition (pp. 36). Victoria, Australia: AIOH.

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 36

End Page


  • 36

Place Of Publication


  • Victoria, Australia