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Landing mechanics in injury prevention and performance rehabilitation

Chapter


Abstract


  • Landings are an extremely common athletic manoeuvre, whether they be a single-limb landing during a running stride or after leaping to catch a ball, a two-footed landing following a vertical jump, or landing on an unstable surface, such as a surfboard, after performing an aerial manoeuvre. Irrespective of the task, the landing phase starts the moment an athlete contacts the supporting surface 1 and continues until their centre of mass stops moving downward and their momentum is zero. From a biomechanical perspective, landings require optimal technical performance while ensuring efficient absorption of the impact forces generated at foot-ground contact to minimise the potential for injury. Landing tasks, particularly those involving high impact forces, have been associated with a variety of injuries, especially ankle ligament sprains, patellar tendon injuries and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Edition


Citation


  • Steele, J., & Sheppard, J. (2015). Landing mechanics in injury prevention and performance rehabilitation. In Sports Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation: Integrating medicine and science for performance solutions (pp. 121-138). doi:10.4324/9780203066485-16

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780415815055

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85127040687

Web Of Science Accession Number


Book Title


  • Sports Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation: Integrating medicine and science for performance solutions

Start Page


  • 121

End Page


  • 138

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Landings are an extremely common athletic manoeuvre, whether they be a single-limb landing during a running stride or after leaping to catch a ball, a two-footed landing following a vertical jump, or landing on an unstable surface, such as a surfboard, after performing an aerial manoeuvre. Irrespective of the task, the landing phase starts the moment an athlete contacts the supporting surface 1 and continues until their centre of mass stops moving downward and their momentum is zero. From a biomechanical perspective, landings require optimal technical performance while ensuring efficient absorption of the impact forces generated at foot-ground contact to minimise the potential for injury. Landing tasks, particularly those involving high impact forces, have been associated with a variety of injuries, especially ankle ligament sprains, patellar tendon injuries and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Edition


Citation


  • Steele, J., & Sheppard, J. (2015). Landing mechanics in injury prevention and performance rehabilitation. In Sports Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation: Integrating medicine and science for performance solutions (pp. 121-138). doi:10.4324/9780203066485-16

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780415815055

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85127040687

Web Of Science Accession Number


Book Title


  • Sports Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation: Integrating medicine and science for performance solutions

Start Page


  • 121

End Page


  • 138

Place Of Publication