Skip to main content
placeholder image

Accounting for the compounding effects of climate change on coastal residents

Chapter


Abstract


  • Existing studies on sea-level rise focus on impacts to specific coastal places and the individuals living and working within those places. There is little consideration of the ways individuals are attached to multiple coastal places and the compounding effect this may have on their overall vulnerability to sea-level rise. The aim of this chapter is to consider the compounding impacts of sea-level rise on permanent and seasonal coastal residents who have ties to geographically dispersed people and places. It draws on interviews with 42 permanent and seasonal residents of five low-lying coastal communities in Victoria, Australia. The results showed that individuals had ties to up to 22 places beyond their home or second home. Their ties to these multiple places will be affected by sea-level rise as well as other climate-related risks, such as bushfires, droughts and floods. New methods are needed that enable future climate change research to consider the compounding risks to individual���s multiple place attachments.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Edition


  • 1

Citation


  • Graham, S. (2022). Accounting for the compounding effects of climate change on coastal residents. In A. Lukasiewicz, & T. O'Donnell (Eds.), Complex Disasters Compounding, Cascading, and Protracted (1 ed., pp. 373 pages). Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9789811924279

Web Of Science Accession Number


Book Title


  • Complex Disasters Compounding, Cascading, and Protracted

Number Of Pages


  • 373

Place Of Publication


  • Singapore

Abstract


  • Existing studies on sea-level rise focus on impacts to specific coastal places and the individuals living and working within those places. There is little consideration of the ways individuals are attached to multiple coastal places and the compounding effect this may have on their overall vulnerability to sea-level rise. The aim of this chapter is to consider the compounding impacts of sea-level rise on permanent and seasonal coastal residents who have ties to geographically dispersed people and places. It draws on interviews with 42 permanent and seasonal residents of five low-lying coastal communities in Victoria, Australia. The results showed that individuals had ties to up to 22 places beyond their home or second home. Their ties to these multiple places will be affected by sea-level rise as well as other climate-related risks, such as bushfires, droughts and floods. New methods are needed that enable future climate change research to consider the compounding risks to individual���s multiple place attachments.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Edition


  • 1

Citation


  • Graham, S. (2022). Accounting for the compounding effects of climate change on coastal residents. In A. Lukasiewicz, & T. O'Donnell (Eds.), Complex Disasters Compounding, Cascading, and Protracted (1 ed., pp. 373 pages). Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9789811924279

Web Of Science Accession Number


Book Title


  • Complex Disasters Compounding, Cascading, and Protracted

Number Of Pages


  • 373

Place Of Publication


  • Singapore