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Did you get the message? Examining prompted and unprompted recall of messages in a safe food-handling media campaign

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Purpose: The prevalence of foodborne illness remains high in Australia. In response, government initiatives have been implemented to inform consumers of ways to safely handle food. The aim of this study was to examine the accuracy of prompted and unprompted recall of messages from a safe food-handling media campaign in Western Australia, and whether this accuracy of prompted and unprompted recall differed by demographic factors and the mode of delivery of the campaign materials. Design/methodology/approach: Survey responses from 121 participants (Mage = 47.15 years, SD = 15.52) who reported seeing or hearing the campaign were analysed. A series of chi-square tests were used to determine the accuracy of recall when prompted and unprompted, and the accuracy of unprompted and prompted recall across demographic factors and mode of delivery. Findings: Results indicated that more participants accurately recalled the campaign messages when prompted (66.1%) compared to unprompted (35.5%), when they had seen outdoor advertisements (e.g. at bus stops or in shopping malls), and if they were between 30 and 45 years of age. Originality/value: This study is the first to explore the uptake and comprehension of messages from a safe food-handling media campaign. Evaluation of safe food-handling media campaigns has shown some efficacy in relation to behaviour change; however, little is known about the uptake or comprehension of the campaign messages, and factors that may influence this.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Charlesworth, J., Liddelow, C., Mullan, B., Tan, H., Abbott, B., & Potter, A. (2022). Did you get the message? Examining prompted and unprompted recall of messages in a safe food-handling media campaign. British Food Journal. doi:10.1108/BFJ-03-2022-0279

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85132834567

Abstract


  • Purpose: The prevalence of foodborne illness remains high in Australia. In response, government initiatives have been implemented to inform consumers of ways to safely handle food. The aim of this study was to examine the accuracy of prompted and unprompted recall of messages from a safe food-handling media campaign in Western Australia, and whether this accuracy of prompted and unprompted recall differed by demographic factors and the mode of delivery of the campaign materials. Design/methodology/approach: Survey responses from 121 participants (Mage = 47.15 years, SD = 15.52) who reported seeing or hearing the campaign were analysed. A series of chi-square tests were used to determine the accuracy of recall when prompted and unprompted, and the accuracy of unprompted and prompted recall across demographic factors and mode of delivery. Findings: Results indicated that more participants accurately recalled the campaign messages when prompted (66.1%) compared to unprompted (35.5%), when they had seen outdoor advertisements (e.g. at bus stops or in shopping malls), and if they were between 30 and 45 years of age. Originality/value: This study is the first to explore the uptake and comprehension of messages from a safe food-handling media campaign. Evaluation of safe food-handling media campaigns has shown some efficacy in relation to behaviour change; however, little is known about the uptake or comprehension of the campaign messages, and factors that may influence this.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Charlesworth, J., Liddelow, C., Mullan, B., Tan, H., Abbott, B., & Potter, A. (2022). Did you get the message? Examining prompted and unprompted recall of messages in a safe food-handling media campaign. British Food Journal. doi:10.1108/BFJ-03-2022-0279

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85132834567