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Direct and indirect costs associated with injury in sub-elite football in Australia: a population study using 3���years of sport insurance records

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Objectives: To determine the direct and indirect costs of injuries in sub-elite footballers in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, stratified by injury location, type, sex and age groups. Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: A de-identified insurance database containing three seasons (2018���2020) of football injuries in NSW was used to determine injury costs. Injuries were coded using the Orchard Sports Injury and Illness Classification System. Claim costs are presented by age group (Junior = 7���17 years, Senior = 18���34 years, and Veteran = 35+ years), sex and injury location and type. Cost data are reported as means �� standard deviation (SD) with 95 % Confidence Intervals (CI). Results: There were 4145 total injury claims, totalling AU$13,716,173, at a mean cost of $3309 (95 % CI 3042���3577) per injury. Joint sprains accrued the largest costs ($6,665,938) with knee injuries accounting for just under half of the total costs of all injuries over the three-season period (49.1 %). ACL injuries accounted for 26.2 % of total costs with a high mean cost per injury ($4564 SD �� 346) alongside lower limb fractures ($4787 SD �� 425) and tendon ruptures ($4659 SD �� 1053). Despite only 22.5 % of injuries accruing indirect costs, these costs accounted for 70.2 % of the total cost ($9,623,665) with the mean indirect cost per injury being ten-times higher than the mean direct cost per injury ($10,337 vs. $987, respectively). Conclusions: Knee injuries (mainly ACL ruptures), joint sprains, fractures and tendon ruptures are the costliest injuries in sub-elite football in NSW. With effective preventative measures available, there is potential to reduce injury rates and subsequent costs.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Ross, A. G., McKay, M. J., Pappas, E., Fortington, L., & Peek, K. (2022). Direct and indirect costs associated with injury in sub-elite football in Australia: a population study using 3���years of sport insurance records. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 25(9), 743-749. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2022.06.005

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85133865197

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 743

End Page


  • 749

Volume


  • 25

Issue


  • 9

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Objectives: To determine the direct and indirect costs of injuries in sub-elite footballers in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, stratified by injury location, type, sex and age groups. Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: A de-identified insurance database containing three seasons (2018���2020) of football injuries in NSW was used to determine injury costs. Injuries were coded using the Orchard Sports Injury and Illness Classification System. Claim costs are presented by age group (Junior = 7���17 years, Senior = 18���34 years, and Veteran = 35+ years), sex and injury location and type. Cost data are reported as means �� standard deviation (SD) with 95 % Confidence Intervals (CI). Results: There were 4145 total injury claims, totalling AU$13,716,173, at a mean cost of $3309 (95 % CI 3042���3577) per injury. Joint sprains accrued the largest costs ($6,665,938) with knee injuries accounting for just under half of the total costs of all injuries over the three-season period (49.1 %). ACL injuries accounted for 26.2 % of total costs with a high mean cost per injury ($4564 SD �� 346) alongside lower limb fractures ($4787 SD �� 425) and tendon ruptures ($4659 SD �� 1053). Despite only 22.5 % of injuries accruing indirect costs, these costs accounted for 70.2 % of the total cost ($9,623,665) with the mean indirect cost per injury being ten-times higher than the mean direct cost per injury ($10,337 vs. $987, respectively). Conclusions: Knee injuries (mainly ACL ruptures), joint sprains, fractures and tendon ruptures are the costliest injuries in sub-elite football in NSW. With effective preventative measures available, there is potential to reduce injury rates and subsequent costs.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Ross, A. G., McKay, M. J., Pappas, E., Fortington, L., & Peek, K. (2022). Direct and indirect costs associated with injury in sub-elite football in Australia: a population study using 3���years of sport insurance records. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 25(9), 743-749. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2022.06.005

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85133865197

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 743

End Page


  • 749

Volume


  • 25

Issue


  • 9

Place Of Publication