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Flexibility in change practices and job outcomes for nurses: Exploring the role of subjective fit

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Aims: To integrate existing theoretical perspectives on change management, subjective fit and occupational stress to better understand the effects of change on employee adjustment. Background: Although subjective fit with organizational goals and objectives has been shown to have positive effects on employee adjustment, its role in the organizational change-occupational stress context is not understood. This represents a caveat in research when considering the notion that those who feel that they fit with the organization's goals may be better equipped to reconcile and deal with change. Design: A cross-sectional survey of nurses from public and non-profit sector hospitals was conducted. Method: Data were collected from 252 public and non-profit sector nurses via online surveys. Data were collected from June-October in 2010. Structural equation modelling was used to test the direct and indirect effects among the focal variables. Results: The results showed that public and non-profit nurses experience flexibility-limiting and flexibility-promoting change initiatives and that these are differentially related to the perception of administrative stressors and adjustment with these relationships directly and indirectly influenced by perceptions of subjective fit. Flexibility-limiting change initiatives led to lower levels of subjective fit, higher levels of administrative stressors and less favourable adjustment. On the other hand, flexibility-promoting change practices led to higher levels of subjective fit, lower levels of administrative stressors and ultimately better adjustment. Conclusion: The results further the theoretical understanding of the role of subjective fit in organizational change and occupational stress theories. �� 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Newton, C., Teo, S. T. T., Pick, D., Yeung, M., & Salamonson, Y. (2013). Flexibility in change practices and job outcomes for nurses: Exploring the role of subjective fit. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 69(12), 2800-2811. doi:10.1111/jan.12198

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84887825068

Start Page


  • 2800

End Page


  • 2811

Volume


  • 69

Issue


  • 12

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Aims: To integrate existing theoretical perspectives on change management, subjective fit and occupational stress to better understand the effects of change on employee adjustment. Background: Although subjective fit with organizational goals and objectives has been shown to have positive effects on employee adjustment, its role in the organizational change-occupational stress context is not understood. This represents a caveat in research when considering the notion that those who feel that they fit with the organization's goals may be better equipped to reconcile and deal with change. Design: A cross-sectional survey of nurses from public and non-profit sector hospitals was conducted. Method: Data were collected from 252 public and non-profit sector nurses via online surveys. Data were collected from June-October in 2010. Structural equation modelling was used to test the direct and indirect effects among the focal variables. Results: The results showed that public and non-profit nurses experience flexibility-limiting and flexibility-promoting change initiatives and that these are differentially related to the perception of administrative stressors and adjustment with these relationships directly and indirectly influenced by perceptions of subjective fit. Flexibility-limiting change initiatives led to lower levels of subjective fit, higher levels of administrative stressors and less favourable adjustment. On the other hand, flexibility-promoting change practices led to higher levels of subjective fit, lower levels of administrative stressors and ultimately better adjustment. Conclusion: The results further the theoretical understanding of the role of subjective fit in organizational change and occupational stress theories. �� 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Newton, C., Teo, S. T. T., Pick, D., Yeung, M., & Salamonson, Y. (2013). Flexibility in change practices and job outcomes for nurses: Exploring the role of subjective fit. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 69(12), 2800-2811. doi:10.1111/jan.12198

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84887825068

Start Page


  • 2800

End Page


  • 2811

Volume


  • 69

Issue


  • 12

Place Of Publication