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Predictors of new graduate nurses' satisfaction with their transitional support programme

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Aim: To examine the influence of new graduate nurses' (NGNs) personal and situational factors on their satisfaction with the practice environment. Background: Transitional support programmes are widely used to provide professional support for NGNs' transitioning-to-practice. However, little is known about whether personal characteristics and situational factors influence NGNs' satisfaction with the practice environment. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey. NGNs were surveyed approximately 8 weeks after commencement of the support programme. In addition to socio-demographic and situational data, two validated, standardised instruments were administered: the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS-26) and the Practice Environment Scale Australia (PES-AUS). Results: A total of 109 NGNs completed the survey. Three independent and significant predictors of NGNs' satisfaction were: (1) unit satisfaction (standardised beta, �� = 0.41); (2) satisfaction with the clinical supervision (�� = 0.31); and (3) assigned unit: critical-care areas (�� = -0.17), explaining 32.5% of the variance. Conclusion This study demonstrates the importance of clinical supervision and unit level support on satisfaction, and the need for additional support for NGNs assigned to critical-care areas. Implications for nursing management: The findings of this study suggest there are modifiable situational factors that influence NGNs' satisfaction with the practice environment, and allocating NGNs to critical-care areas on their first rotation should be avoided.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Hussein, R., Everett, B., Hu, W., Smith, A., Thornton, A., Chang, S., & Salamonson, Y. (2016). Predictors of new graduate nurses' satisfaction with their transitional support programme. Journal of Nursing Management, 24(3), 319-326. doi:10.1111/jonm.12321

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84962859089

Start Page


  • 319

End Page


  • 326

Volume


  • 24

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Aim: To examine the influence of new graduate nurses' (NGNs) personal and situational factors on their satisfaction with the practice environment. Background: Transitional support programmes are widely used to provide professional support for NGNs' transitioning-to-practice. However, little is known about whether personal characteristics and situational factors influence NGNs' satisfaction with the practice environment. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey. NGNs were surveyed approximately 8 weeks after commencement of the support programme. In addition to socio-demographic and situational data, two validated, standardised instruments were administered: the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS-26) and the Practice Environment Scale Australia (PES-AUS). Results: A total of 109 NGNs completed the survey. Three independent and significant predictors of NGNs' satisfaction were: (1) unit satisfaction (standardised beta, �� = 0.41); (2) satisfaction with the clinical supervision (�� = 0.31); and (3) assigned unit: critical-care areas (�� = -0.17), explaining 32.5% of the variance. Conclusion This study demonstrates the importance of clinical supervision and unit level support on satisfaction, and the need for additional support for NGNs assigned to critical-care areas. Implications for nursing management: The findings of this study suggest there are modifiable situational factors that influence NGNs' satisfaction with the practice environment, and allocating NGNs to critical-care areas on their first rotation should be avoided.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Hussein, R., Everett, B., Hu, W., Smith, A., Thornton, A., Chang, S., & Salamonson, Y. (2016). Predictors of new graduate nurses' satisfaction with their transitional support programme. Journal of Nursing Management, 24(3), 319-326. doi:10.1111/jonm.12321

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84962859089

Start Page


  • 319

End Page


  • 326

Volume


  • 24

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication