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Access to food choices by older people in residential aged care: An integrative review

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Background: There is increasing concern regarding autonomy and quality of life for older people living in residential aged care. Failure to provide food choices and suitable dining environments has been reported to negatively impact their nutritional status, undermining their sense of autonomy and quality of life. Aim: This paper presents an integrative review of studies on food choices in residential aged care and explores the relationships between food choices, autonomy and quality of life. Methods: Search of nine databases CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, ProQuest, Cochrane, Embase, AMED, and Social Science Citation Index, identified nine primary articles. The Critical Appraisal Skill Program tool was used to examine the quality of these articles. Findings: Three key themes were identified: (1) Prevalence of food choices and catering for residents��� preference; (2) Importance of food choices to nutritional status; (3) Impact of food choices on autonomy and quality of life. The importance of increasing staff awareness and a need to develop aged care regulation to ensure adequate food choices provided. Discussion: The importance of increasing staff awareness regarding the interrelatedness of respecting older people's food choices, autonomy and quality of life is identified. The needs of determining aged care regulation and accreditation standards were also highlighted. Conclusion: Failure to provide satisfying food choices impacts older people's quality of life. However, the strength of the relationships between food choices, autonomy and quality of life requires further study.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Wang, D., Everett, B., Northall, T., Villarosa, A. R., & Salamonson, Y. (2018). Access to food choices by older people in residential aged care: An integrative review. Collegian, 25(4), 457-465. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2017.11.004

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85044642003

Start Page


  • 457

End Page


  • 465

Volume


  • 25

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Background: There is increasing concern regarding autonomy and quality of life for older people living in residential aged care. Failure to provide food choices and suitable dining environments has been reported to negatively impact their nutritional status, undermining their sense of autonomy and quality of life. Aim: This paper presents an integrative review of studies on food choices in residential aged care and explores the relationships between food choices, autonomy and quality of life. Methods: Search of nine databases CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, ProQuest, Cochrane, Embase, AMED, and Social Science Citation Index, identified nine primary articles. The Critical Appraisal Skill Program tool was used to examine the quality of these articles. Findings: Three key themes were identified: (1) Prevalence of food choices and catering for residents��� preference; (2) Importance of food choices to nutritional status; (3) Impact of food choices on autonomy and quality of life. The importance of increasing staff awareness and a need to develop aged care regulation to ensure adequate food choices provided. Discussion: The importance of increasing staff awareness regarding the interrelatedness of respecting older people's food choices, autonomy and quality of life is identified. The needs of determining aged care regulation and accreditation standards were also highlighted. Conclusion: Failure to provide satisfying food choices impacts older people's quality of life. However, the strength of the relationships between food choices, autonomy and quality of life requires further study.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Wang, D., Everett, B., Northall, T., Villarosa, A. R., & Salamonson, Y. (2018). Access to food choices by older people in residential aged care: An integrative review. Collegian, 25(4), 457-465. doi:10.1016/j.colegn.2017.11.004

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85044642003

Start Page


  • 457

End Page


  • 465

Volume


  • 25

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication