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Clinical supervision and ward orientation predict new graduate nurses��� intention to work in critical care: Findings from a prospective observational study

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Introduction: Clinical supervision and transitional support programs are important in supporting the successful transition and retention of new graduate nurses and their intention to work in specialty settings. However, little is known about which elements of support programs influence this intention. This study aimed to examine new graduate nurses' perceptions of clinical supervision and the practice environment, and how these influenced their intention to stay in critical and non-critical care areas following their transitional support program. Methods: Between May 2012 and August 2013, new graduate nurses (n = 87) were surveyed towards the end of their 12-month transitional support program. In addition to demographic and ward details, participants completed the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS) and the Practice Environment Scale Australia (PES-AUS). The ���Intention to Stay in a Clinical Specialty��� survey was used to measure new graduate nurses��� intention to remain working in their current ward or unit. Results: Predictors of new graduate nurses' intention to stay in their current ward/unit were not having to practise beyond personal clinical capability (AOR: 4.215, 95% CI: 1.099���16.167) and working in a critical care specialty (AOR: 6.530, 95% CI: 1.911-22.314). Further analysis of those nurses who indicated an intention to remain in critical care revealed that high satisfaction with clinical supervision (AOR: 3.861, 95% CI: 1.320���11.293) and high satisfaction with unit orientation (AOR: 3.629, 95% CI: 1.236���10.659) were significant predictors. Conclusion: While this study identified that new graduates who worked within their scope of practice were more likely to report their intention to remain in their current ward, new graduates assigned to critical care were six times more likely to indicate their intention to remain than new graduates in other wards/units. Ensuring new graduate nurses assigned to critical care areas receive good unit orientation and clinical supervision increases their intention to remain in this setting.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Hussein, R., Salamonson, Y., Hu, W., & Everett, B. (2019). Clinical supervision and ward orientation predict new graduate nurses��� intention to work in critical care: Findings from a prospective observational study. Australian Critical Care, 32(5), 397-402. doi:10.1016/j.aucc.2018.09.003

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85056909207

Start Page


  • 397

End Page


  • 402

Volume


  • 32

Issue


  • 5

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Introduction: Clinical supervision and transitional support programs are important in supporting the successful transition and retention of new graduate nurses and their intention to work in specialty settings. However, little is known about which elements of support programs influence this intention. This study aimed to examine new graduate nurses' perceptions of clinical supervision and the practice environment, and how these influenced their intention to stay in critical and non-critical care areas following their transitional support program. Methods: Between May 2012 and August 2013, new graduate nurses (n = 87) were surveyed towards the end of their 12-month transitional support program. In addition to demographic and ward details, participants completed the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS) and the Practice Environment Scale Australia (PES-AUS). The ���Intention to Stay in a Clinical Specialty��� survey was used to measure new graduate nurses��� intention to remain working in their current ward or unit. Results: Predictors of new graduate nurses' intention to stay in their current ward/unit were not having to practise beyond personal clinical capability (AOR: 4.215, 95% CI: 1.099���16.167) and working in a critical care specialty (AOR: 6.530, 95% CI: 1.911-22.314). Further analysis of those nurses who indicated an intention to remain in critical care revealed that high satisfaction with clinical supervision (AOR: 3.861, 95% CI: 1.320���11.293) and high satisfaction with unit orientation (AOR: 3.629, 95% CI: 1.236���10.659) were significant predictors. Conclusion: While this study identified that new graduates who worked within their scope of practice were more likely to report their intention to remain in their current ward, new graduates assigned to critical care were six times more likely to indicate their intention to remain than new graduates in other wards/units. Ensuring new graduate nurses assigned to critical care areas receive good unit orientation and clinical supervision increases their intention to remain in this setting.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Hussein, R., Salamonson, Y., Hu, W., & Everett, B. (2019). Clinical supervision and ward orientation predict new graduate nurses��� intention to work in critical care: Findings from a prospective observational study. Australian Critical Care, 32(5), 397-402. doi:10.1016/j.aucc.2018.09.003

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85056909207

Start Page


  • 397

End Page


  • 402

Volume


  • 32

Issue


  • 5

Place Of Publication