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���Some say no, some say yes���: Receiving inconsistent or insufficient information from healthcare professionals and consequences for diabetes self-management: A qualitative study in patients with Type 2 Diabetes

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Aims: To explore the information-seeking experiences of patients with Type 2 diabetes and how these influenced self-management behaviours. Methods: We interviewed 18 patients with Type 2 Diabetes attending outpatient diabetes centers in South Western Sydney. Data were analyzed thematically. Results: Patients described a number of challenges they faced when seeking information about diabetes self-management. One major challenge was receiving inconsistent and insufficient information from healthcare professionals, which consequently undermined patients��� ability to self-manage diabetes. This became a disincentive in carrying out self-management tasks, and led to confusion and mistrust regarding the veracity of information received. Participants also described finding reliable information, and difficulty understanding and accessing relevant information as challenges. Medical jargon and lack of comprehensive explanations exacerbated knowledge deficits compounded by the complex maze of internet resources that some patients accessed. In response to what they perceived as confusing or inconsistent information, some patients followed ���their own way��� of managing their diabetes. Conclusions: Inconsistent information not tailored to the needs of patients adversely affects self-management. Taking time to provide simple explanations and assisting patients in navigating reliable web resources is becoming a vital role of healthcare professionals to reduce knowledge gaps in patients with low health literacy.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Maneze, D., Weaver, R., Kovai, V., Salamonson, Y., Astorga, C., Yogendran, D., & Everett, B. (2019). ���Some say no, some say yes���: Receiving inconsistent or insufficient information from healthcare professionals and consequences for diabetes self-management: A qualitative study in patients with Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 156. doi:10.1016/j.diabres.2019.107830

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85071608139

Volume


  • 156

Issue


Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Aims: To explore the information-seeking experiences of patients with Type 2 diabetes and how these influenced self-management behaviours. Methods: We interviewed 18 patients with Type 2 Diabetes attending outpatient diabetes centers in South Western Sydney. Data were analyzed thematically. Results: Patients described a number of challenges they faced when seeking information about diabetes self-management. One major challenge was receiving inconsistent and insufficient information from healthcare professionals, which consequently undermined patients��� ability to self-manage diabetes. This became a disincentive in carrying out self-management tasks, and led to confusion and mistrust regarding the veracity of information received. Participants also described finding reliable information, and difficulty understanding and accessing relevant information as challenges. Medical jargon and lack of comprehensive explanations exacerbated knowledge deficits compounded by the complex maze of internet resources that some patients accessed. In response to what they perceived as confusing or inconsistent information, some patients followed ���their own way��� of managing their diabetes. Conclusions: Inconsistent information not tailored to the needs of patients adversely affects self-management. Taking time to provide simple explanations and assisting patients in navigating reliable web resources is becoming a vital role of healthcare professionals to reduce knowledge gaps in patients with low health literacy.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Maneze, D., Weaver, R., Kovai, V., Salamonson, Y., Astorga, C., Yogendran, D., & Everett, B. (2019). ���Some say no, some say yes���: Receiving inconsistent or insufficient information from healthcare professionals and consequences for diabetes self-management: A qualitative study in patients with Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 156. doi:10.1016/j.diabres.2019.107830

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85071608139

Volume


  • 156

Issue


Place Of Publication