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Does self-efficacy for medication administration predict clinical skill performance in first-year nursing students? An inception-cohort study

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Background: Medication administration is an essential skill which is integrated in all nursing curricula to prepare nursing students for safe clinical practice. Although self-efficacy is linked to performance, little is known about its relationship to medication administration. Aim: To examine the relationship between nursing students' self-efficacy in medication administration and actual performance. Method: A pre-and post-test design was used to assess the relationship between nursing students' self-efficacy and performance in medication administration. Undergraduate nursing students (n=715) enrolled in a first-year nursing skill unit between June to October 2017 at a multi-campus university in Australia, participated in the study. Data were collected at three time-points: i) baseline, including assessing pre-instruction medication administration self-efficacy; ii) 7-week follow-up; including assessing post-instruction medication administration self-efficacy; and open-ended items; iii) retrieval of grades one week later. Findings: Although there was no significant association between medication administration self-efficacy and achieving a satisfactory grade in the medication administration assessment, skill performance was linked to perceptions of clinical skills practice sessions. Conclusions: This study identified that factors other than self-efficacy such as the practice environment and tutor support need to be considered to ensure student success in medication administration.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Gregory, L. R., Ramjan, L. M., Villarosa, A. R., Rojo, J., Raymond, D., & Salamonson, Y. (2022). Does self-efficacy for medication administration predict clinical skill performance in first-year nursing students? An inception-cohort study. Teaching and Learning in Nursing, 17(1), 77-83. doi:10.1016/j.teln.2021.10.002

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85120435562

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 77

End Page


  • 83

Volume


  • 17

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Background: Medication administration is an essential skill which is integrated in all nursing curricula to prepare nursing students for safe clinical practice. Although self-efficacy is linked to performance, little is known about its relationship to medication administration. Aim: To examine the relationship between nursing students' self-efficacy in medication administration and actual performance. Method: A pre-and post-test design was used to assess the relationship between nursing students' self-efficacy and performance in medication administration. Undergraduate nursing students (n=715) enrolled in a first-year nursing skill unit between June to October 2017 at a multi-campus university in Australia, participated in the study. Data were collected at three time-points: i) baseline, including assessing pre-instruction medication administration self-efficacy; ii) 7-week follow-up; including assessing post-instruction medication administration self-efficacy; and open-ended items; iii) retrieval of grades one week later. Findings: Although there was no significant association between medication administration self-efficacy and achieving a satisfactory grade in the medication administration assessment, skill performance was linked to perceptions of clinical skills practice sessions. Conclusions: This study identified that factors other than self-efficacy such as the practice environment and tutor support need to be considered to ensure student success in medication administration.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Gregory, L. R., Ramjan, L. M., Villarosa, A. R., Rojo, J., Raymond, D., & Salamonson, Y. (2022). Does self-efficacy for medication administration predict clinical skill performance in first-year nursing students? An inception-cohort study. Teaching and Learning in Nursing, 17(1), 77-83. doi:10.1016/j.teln.2021.10.002

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85120435562

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 77

End Page


  • 83

Volume


  • 17

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication