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Matrine induces programmed cell death and regulates expression of relevant genes based on PCR array analysis in C6 glioma cells.

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Matrine, one of the main components extracted from Sophora flavescens Ait, has a wide range of pharmacological effects including anti-tumor activities on a number of cancer cell lines. This study has investigated whether matrine could also display anti-tumor action on rat C6 glioma cells. Exposure of C6 cells to matrine resulted in inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by the MTT assay and Flow cytometry. The Annexin V/PI staining further detected the apoptotic cells at both early and late phases of apoptosis. We used AO/EB staining to examine the programmed cell death of matrine-treated C6 cells, and showed that the death rate detected by AO/EB staining was higher than the apoptosis rate measured by Annexin V/PI staining, suggesting that autophagy, the Type II programmed cell death, may be involved in matrine-induced cell death, which was further confirmed by electronic microscopy. To explore the molecular mechanism, an apoptosis real-time PCR array was performed, which has demonstrated that 57 genes were at least 2-fold upregulated, and 11 genes were at least 2-fold downregulated in matrine-treated C6 cells, compared with untreated cells. However, the gene expression profiles could only partly and roughly explain molecular mechanisms of apoptosis and autophagy in matrine-treated C6 cells, thus further investigations are required to confirm the specific molecular pathways and related molecules responsible for the programmed cell death.

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Zhang, S., Qi, J., Sun, L., Cheng, B., Pan, S., Zhou, M., & Sun, X. (2009). Matrine induces programmed cell death and regulates expression of relevant genes based on PCR array analysis in C6 glioma cells.. Molecular biology reports, 36(4), 791-799. doi:10.1007/s11033-008-9247-y

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 791

End Page


  • 799

Volume


  • 36

Issue


  • 4

Abstract


  • Matrine, one of the main components extracted from Sophora flavescens Ait, has a wide range of pharmacological effects including anti-tumor activities on a number of cancer cell lines. This study has investigated whether matrine could also display anti-tumor action on rat C6 glioma cells. Exposure of C6 cells to matrine resulted in inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by the MTT assay and Flow cytometry. The Annexin V/PI staining further detected the apoptotic cells at both early and late phases of apoptosis. We used AO/EB staining to examine the programmed cell death of matrine-treated C6 cells, and showed that the death rate detected by AO/EB staining was higher than the apoptosis rate measured by Annexin V/PI staining, suggesting that autophagy, the Type II programmed cell death, may be involved in matrine-induced cell death, which was further confirmed by electronic microscopy. To explore the molecular mechanism, an apoptosis real-time PCR array was performed, which has demonstrated that 57 genes were at least 2-fold upregulated, and 11 genes were at least 2-fold downregulated in matrine-treated C6 cells, compared with untreated cells. However, the gene expression profiles could only partly and roughly explain molecular mechanisms of apoptosis and autophagy in matrine-treated C6 cells, thus further investigations are required to confirm the specific molecular pathways and related molecules responsible for the programmed cell death.

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Zhang, S., Qi, J., Sun, L., Cheng, B., Pan, S., Zhou, M., & Sun, X. (2009). Matrine induces programmed cell death and regulates expression of relevant genes based on PCR array analysis in C6 glioma cells.. Molecular biology reports, 36(4), 791-799. doi:10.1007/s11033-008-9247-y

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 791

End Page


  • 799

Volume


  • 36

Issue


  • 4