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Is prescience really required by modern occupational health and safety law. A case study

Journal Article


Abstract


  • A review of the courts' interpretation of occupational health and safety law is used to illustrate the need for formal analysis of equipment designs. A comparison is made between engineering literature and views expressed by the courts on the issues of risk and foreseeability. Some of the methods available are outlined together with a case study in which fault-tree analysis was used after an incident in an attempt to foresee what further risks exist.

Publication Date


  • 1992

Citation


  • Dwight, R. (1992). Is prescience really required by modern occupational health and safety law. A case study. Mechanical Engineering Transactions - Institution of Engineers, Australia, ME17(2), 107-114.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0026914926

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 107

End Page


  • 114

Volume


  • ME17

Issue


  • 2

Abstract


  • A review of the courts' interpretation of occupational health and safety law is used to illustrate the need for formal analysis of equipment designs. A comparison is made between engineering literature and views expressed by the courts on the issues of risk and foreseeability. Some of the methods available are outlined together with a case study in which fault-tree analysis was used after an incident in an attempt to foresee what further risks exist.

Publication Date


  • 1992

Citation


  • Dwight, R. (1992). Is prescience really required by modern occupational health and safety law. A case study. Mechanical Engineering Transactions - Institution of Engineers, Australia, ME17(2), 107-114.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0026914926

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 107

End Page


  • 114

Volume


  • ME17

Issue


  • 2