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Lendlease Aged Care Facility ¿ Outcomes Report

Report


Type Of Work


  • Report

Abstract


  • The IDS-10 Lendlease Residential Aged Care builds upon lessons learnt from the previous integrated design studios undertaken by the University of Melbourne (UoM). This design studio was initiated early March 2021 after substantial stakeholder engagement that commenced in Q4 of 2020. In the first week of autumn semester, the Lendlease client provided an introduction to the Lendlease Health and Wellbeing Precinct and provided the project participants with a brief on the Residential Aged Care Facility. This brief sets the goals and constraints of the integrated design process.

    Multi-disciplinary teams of architectural engineering, civil engineering, environmental engineering, and mechanical engineering students produced a number of return briefs with guidance from industry consultants and student tutors.

    The design studio combines the input of three subjects from two separate schools at both an undergraduate and master’s level. The student outcomes for the subjects were aligned to focus on producing integrated solutions that target ‘Net Zero’ design. Due to the impact of COVID-19 the studios were delivered via a mixed online and face-to-face platform with most participants choosing to attend the weekly studios in person where they could interact with team members, the consultants, and tutors.

    Work progressed with students generating a number of design solutions to meet the client’s needs. They evaluated the designs via self-generated evaluation matrices, with final design evaluations having been presented to both the consultants and clients. These finalised designs involved students completing a detailed design and analysis of expected outcomes compared against a business-as-usual (BAU) baseline. This process has resulted in a number of innovative design solutions, which are further examined through the vetting report.

    The most important findings in relation to the integrated design process were:

    • A concurrent collaborative design has significant benefits and empowers architects and engineers to overcome their perceptions about their capabilities in terms of exploring design solutions.

    • A well-defined framework of the integrated design studio process is essential and guides the designers to produce a plethora of interesting design solutions.

    • Feedback mechanisms and interactions between clients, consultants, academics and students are important for the success of the project.

    • Challenges arise when developing integrated design solutions for existing buildings in terms of flexibility of the approaches taken, however existing buildings also offer some advantages such as the possibility to discuss issues with occupants, the option to undertake spot measurements as well as identify inefficient technologies or systems.

    • Overcoming initial communication hesitancies witnessed in students is key to productive idea generation and discussion, assisting in facilitating a positive and creative design environment.

    In terms of technical findings suitable for the building type and climate, the design solutions identified by the consultants are attributed to five key categories. The solutions associated with the categories are explored further in Section 6.2 and in the consultant vetting report. These categories include:

    • Design for Wellbeing

    • Passive design solutions

    • Operational improvements

    • Additional renewable energy generation

    • Embodied Carbon

    Overall, the IDS process has proven valuable for all participants and is now intended to become a permanent approach in the training of students. The IDS has empowered participants to overcome constraints in relation to their field of expertise – architecture and engineering – to improve technical outcomes and enable the architecture rather than compromising on it as is often the case.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • McDowell, C., Roth, J., Kokogiannakis, G., & Heffernan, E. (2021). Lendlease Aged Care Facility ¿ Outcomes Report. Wollongong, NSW, Australia: AIRAH. Retrieved from https://www.airah.org.au/

Web Of Science Accession Number


Place Of Publication


  • Wollongong, NSW, Australia

Type Of Work


  • Report

Abstract


  • The IDS-10 Lendlease Residential Aged Care builds upon lessons learnt from the previous integrated design studios undertaken by the University of Melbourne (UoM). This design studio was initiated early March 2021 after substantial stakeholder engagement that commenced in Q4 of 2020. In the first week of autumn semester, the Lendlease client provided an introduction to the Lendlease Health and Wellbeing Precinct and provided the project participants with a brief on the Residential Aged Care Facility. This brief sets the goals and constraints of the integrated design process.

    Multi-disciplinary teams of architectural engineering, civil engineering, environmental engineering, and mechanical engineering students produced a number of return briefs with guidance from industry consultants and student tutors.

    The design studio combines the input of three subjects from two separate schools at both an undergraduate and master’s level. The student outcomes for the subjects were aligned to focus on producing integrated solutions that target ‘Net Zero’ design. Due to the impact of COVID-19 the studios were delivered via a mixed online and face-to-face platform with most participants choosing to attend the weekly studios in person where they could interact with team members, the consultants, and tutors.

    Work progressed with students generating a number of design solutions to meet the client’s needs. They evaluated the designs via self-generated evaluation matrices, with final design evaluations having been presented to both the consultants and clients. These finalised designs involved students completing a detailed design and analysis of expected outcomes compared against a business-as-usual (BAU) baseline. This process has resulted in a number of innovative design solutions, which are further examined through the vetting report.

    The most important findings in relation to the integrated design process were:

    • A concurrent collaborative design has significant benefits and empowers architects and engineers to overcome their perceptions about their capabilities in terms of exploring design solutions.

    • A well-defined framework of the integrated design studio process is essential and guides the designers to produce a plethora of interesting design solutions.

    • Feedback mechanisms and interactions between clients, consultants, academics and students are important for the success of the project.

    • Challenges arise when developing integrated design solutions for existing buildings in terms of flexibility of the approaches taken, however existing buildings also offer some advantages such as the possibility to discuss issues with occupants, the option to undertake spot measurements as well as identify inefficient technologies or systems.

    • Overcoming initial communication hesitancies witnessed in students is key to productive idea generation and discussion, assisting in facilitating a positive and creative design environment.

    In terms of technical findings suitable for the building type and climate, the design solutions identified by the consultants are attributed to five key categories. The solutions associated with the categories are explored further in Section 6.2 and in the consultant vetting report. These categories include:

    • Design for Wellbeing

    • Passive design solutions

    • Operational improvements

    • Additional renewable energy generation

    • Embodied Carbon

    Overall, the IDS process has proven valuable for all participants and is now intended to become a permanent approach in the training of students. The IDS has empowered participants to overcome constraints in relation to their field of expertise – architecture and engineering – to improve technical outcomes and enable the architecture rather than compromising on it as is often the case.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • McDowell, C., Roth, J., Kokogiannakis, G., & Heffernan, E. (2021). Lendlease Aged Care Facility ¿ Outcomes Report. Wollongong, NSW, Australia: AIRAH. Retrieved from https://www.airah.org.au/

Web Of Science Accession Number


Place Of Publication


  • Wollongong, NSW, Australia