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Wearable Photo-Thermo-Electrochemical Cells (PTECs) Harvesting Solar Energy

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Solar induced thermal energy is a vital heat source supplementing body heat to realize thermo-to-electric energy supply for wearable electronics. Thermo-electrochemical cells, compared to the widely investigated thermoelectric generators, show greater potential in wearable applications due to the higher voltage output from low-grade heat and the increased option range of cheap and flexible electrode/electrolyte materials. A wearable photo-thermo-electrochemical cell (PTEC) is first fabricated here through the introduction of a polymer-based flexible photothermal film as a solar-absorber and hot electrode, followed by a systematic investigation of wearable device design. The as-prepared PTEC single device shows outstanding output voltage and current density of 15.0��mV and 10.8��A��m���2 and 7.1��mV and 8.57��A��m���2, for the device employing p-type and n-type gel electrolytes, respectively. Benefiting from the equivalent performance in current density, a series connection containing 18��pairs of p���n PTEC devices is effectively made, which can harvest solar energy and charge supercapacitors to above 250��mV (1��sun solar illumination). Meanwhile, a watch-strap shaped flexible PTEC (eight p���n pairs) that can be worn on a wrist is fabricated and the realized voltage above 150��mV under light shows the potential for use in wearable applications.

UOW Authors


  •   Qin, Chunyan (external author)
  •   Zhang, Shuai (external author)
  •   Zhou, Yuetong (external author)
  •   Kim, Kyuman (external author)
  •   Du, Yumeng (external author)
  •   Beirne, Stephen
  •   Cheng, Zhenxiang
  •   Wallace, Gordon

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Liu, Y., Zhang, S., Beirne, S., Kim, K., Qin, C., Du, Y., . . . Chen, J. (2022). Wearable Photo-Thermo-Electrochemical Cells (PTECs) Harvesting Solar Energy. Macromolecular Rapid Communications, 43(6). doi:10.1002/marc.202200001

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85124109103

Volume


  • 43

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Solar induced thermal energy is a vital heat source supplementing body heat to realize thermo-to-electric energy supply for wearable electronics. Thermo-electrochemical cells, compared to the widely investigated thermoelectric generators, show greater potential in wearable applications due to the higher voltage output from low-grade heat and the increased option range of cheap and flexible electrode/electrolyte materials. A wearable photo-thermo-electrochemical cell (PTEC) is first fabricated here through the introduction of a polymer-based flexible photothermal film as a solar-absorber and hot electrode, followed by a systematic investigation of wearable device design. The as-prepared PTEC single device shows outstanding output voltage and current density of 15.0��mV and 10.8��A��m���2 and 7.1��mV and 8.57��A��m���2, for the device employing p-type and n-type gel electrolytes, respectively. Benefiting from the equivalent performance in current density, a series connection containing 18��pairs of p���n PTEC devices is effectively made, which can harvest solar energy and charge supercapacitors to above 250��mV (1��sun solar illumination). Meanwhile, a watch-strap shaped flexible PTEC (eight p���n pairs) that can be worn on a wrist is fabricated and the realized voltage above 150��mV under light shows the potential for use in wearable applications.

UOW Authors


  •   Qin, Chunyan (external author)
  •   Zhang, Shuai (external author)
  •   Zhou, Yuetong (external author)
  •   Kim, Kyuman (external author)
  •   Du, Yumeng (external author)
  •   Beirne, Stephen
  •   Cheng, Zhenxiang
  •   Wallace, Gordon

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Liu, Y., Zhang, S., Beirne, S., Kim, K., Qin, C., Du, Y., . . . Chen, J. (2022). Wearable Photo-Thermo-Electrochemical Cells (PTECs) Harvesting Solar Energy. Macromolecular Rapid Communications, 43(6). doi:10.1002/marc.202200001

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85124109103

Volume


  • 43

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication