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Antenatal mind-mindedness and its relationship to maternal-fetal attachment in pregnant women

Journal Article


Abstract


  • In this study, researchers aimed to investigate whether a relationship exists between maternal-fetal attachment (MFA) and antenatal mind-mindedness in a sample of Australian pregnant women (n = 43). Participants completed the Maternal Fetal Attachment Scale (MFAS) in their second and third trimester, and a modified ‘describe your baby’ interview with the inclusion of general prompts as a measure of antenatal mind-mindedness in their third trimester. Positive correlations were observed between mental comments, but not total predictions, made by women during the modified antenatal mind-mindedness task and MFAS scores at the second and third trimesters. An average of 6.07 total predictions and 1.30 mental predictions were made before prompts, increasing to 17.65 total comments and 6.58 mental comments after prompts. Prompts within the mind-mindedness task resulted in 42 participants making at least one mental prediction (M = 6.58). Our findings provide the first evidence for a relationship between MFA and antenatal mind-mindedness, and highlight the importance of considering mind-mindedness during pregnancy in the developing bond from mother to baby.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • McNamara, J., Mitchell, A. S., Russell, S., Townsend, M. L., & Herbert, J. S. (2021). Antenatal mind-mindedness and its relationship to maternal-fetal attachment in pregnant women. Health Care for Women International. doi:10.1080/07399332.2021.2003800

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85122512438

Abstract


  • In this study, researchers aimed to investigate whether a relationship exists between maternal-fetal attachment (MFA) and antenatal mind-mindedness in a sample of Australian pregnant women (n = 43). Participants completed the Maternal Fetal Attachment Scale (MFAS) in their second and third trimester, and a modified ‘describe your baby’ interview with the inclusion of general prompts as a measure of antenatal mind-mindedness in their third trimester. Positive correlations were observed between mental comments, but not total predictions, made by women during the modified antenatal mind-mindedness task and MFAS scores at the second and third trimesters. An average of 6.07 total predictions and 1.30 mental predictions were made before prompts, increasing to 17.65 total comments and 6.58 mental comments after prompts. Prompts within the mind-mindedness task resulted in 42 participants making at least one mental prediction (M = 6.58). Our findings provide the first evidence for a relationship between MFA and antenatal mind-mindedness, and highlight the importance of considering mind-mindedness during pregnancy in the developing bond from mother to baby.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • McNamara, J., Mitchell, A. S., Russell, S., Townsend, M. L., & Herbert, J. S. (2021). Antenatal mind-mindedness and its relationship to maternal-fetal attachment in pregnant women. Health Care for Women International. doi:10.1080/07399332.2021.2003800

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85122512438