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The impact of therapeutic opioid agonists on driving-related psychomotor skills assessed by a driving simulator or an on-road driving task: A systematic review

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Background: Driving cessation is associated with poor health-related outcomes. People with chronic diseases are often prescribed long-term opioid agonists that have the potential to impair driving. Studies evaluating the impact of opioids on driving-related psychomotor skills report contradictory results likely due to heterogeneous designs, assessment tools and study populations. A better understanding of the effects of regular therapeutic opioid agonists on driving can help to inform the balance between individual���s independence and community safety. Aim: To identify the literature assessing the impact of regular therapeutic opioid agonists on driving-related psychomotor skills for people with chronic pain or chronic breathlessness. Design: Systematic review reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis statement; PROSPERO Registration CRD42017055909. Data sources: Six electronic databases and grey literature were systematically searched up to January, 2017. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) empirical studies reporting data on driving simulation, on-the-road driving tasks or driving outcomes; (2) people with chronic pain or chronic breathlessness; and (3) taking regular therapeutic opioid agonists. Critical appraisal used the National Institutes of Health���s quality assessment tools. Results: From 3809 records screened, three studies matched the inclusion criteria. All reported data on people with chronic non-malignant pain. No significant impact of regular therapeutic opioid agonists on people���s driving-related psychomotor skills was reported. One study reported more intense pain significantly worsened driving performance. Conclusion: This systematic review does not identify impaired simulated driving performance when people take regular therapeutic opioid agonists for symptom control, although more prospective studies are needed.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Ferreira, D. H., Boland, J. W., Phillips, J. L., Lam, L., & Currow, D. C. (2018). The impact of therapeutic opioid agonists on driving-related psychomotor skills assessed by a driving simulator or an on-road driving task: A systematic review. Palliative Medicine, 32(4), 786-803. doi:10.1177/0269216317746583

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85042226053

Start Page


  • 786

End Page


  • 803

Volume


  • 32

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Background: Driving cessation is associated with poor health-related outcomes. People with chronic diseases are often prescribed long-term opioid agonists that have the potential to impair driving. Studies evaluating the impact of opioids on driving-related psychomotor skills report contradictory results likely due to heterogeneous designs, assessment tools and study populations. A better understanding of the effects of regular therapeutic opioid agonists on driving can help to inform the balance between individual���s independence and community safety. Aim: To identify the literature assessing the impact of regular therapeutic opioid agonists on driving-related psychomotor skills for people with chronic pain or chronic breathlessness. Design: Systematic review reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis statement; PROSPERO Registration CRD42017055909. Data sources: Six electronic databases and grey literature were systematically searched up to January, 2017. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) empirical studies reporting data on driving simulation, on-the-road driving tasks or driving outcomes; (2) people with chronic pain or chronic breathlessness; and (3) taking regular therapeutic opioid agonists. Critical appraisal used the National Institutes of Health���s quality assessment tools. Results: From 3809 records screened, three studies matched the inclusion criteria. All reported data on people with chronic non-malignant pain. No significant impact of regular therapeutic opioid agonists on people���s driving-related psychomotor skills was reported. One study reported more intense pain significantly worsened driving performance. Conclusion: This systematic review does not identify impaired simulated driving performance when people take regular therapeutic opioid agonists for symptom control, although more prospective studies are needed.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Ferreira, D. H., Boland, J. W., Phillips, J. L., Lam, L., & Currow, D. C. (2018). The impact of therapeutic opioid agonists on driving-related psychomotor skills assessed by a driving simulator or an on-road driving task: A systematic review. Palliative Medicine, 32(4), 786-803. doi:10.1177/0269216317746583

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85042226053

Start Page


  • 786

End Page


  • 803

Volume


  • 32

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication