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Exhaled nitric oxide levels in atopic children - Relation to skin prick test-results

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) is proposed as a measure of airway inflammation, but may be more strongly related to atopy than to asthma. Allergic sensitisation to house-dust mite and mould spores is a strong risk factor for asthma, whereas sensitisation to grass pollen is a weak or nonsignificant risk Aim: To determine if eNO levels are associated with sensitisation to specific allergens, rather than with a more general atopy. Methods: A sample of 312 atopic children, aged 9-13 years from Wagga Wagga and Moree had eNO measured, and a skin prick test to eight allergen in the winter, outside the pollen season. Expired air was collected in a 3L wine cask bag and the NO content measured by chemiluminescent analyser. At the skin prick test, a wheal size >3 mm was defined as positive. Results: The prevalence of sensitisation to house-dust mite was 61.27%, to Alternaria is 46.35%, to ryegrass pollen 50.48%, and to Cladosporium 25.4%. Univariate analyses showed an association between eNO and both the number of positive skin prick reactions (r=0.3, p<0.001) and maximum wheal size (r=0.189, p<0.01). However, using multiple linear regression, which took into account the wheal size for all allergen tests, only the size of the response to House-dust mite and Cladosporium were significant predictors of eNO (p<0.01). The number of positive skin prick reactions was not an independent predictor of eNO. Conclusion: In this sample of atopic children, high eNO levels were associated with allergic sensitisation to house-dust mite and Cladosporium, but not with sensitisation to grass pollens. House-dust mite and Cladosporium may be more likely to cause airway inflammation relevant to asthma.

Publication Date


  • 1999

Citation


  • Leuppi, J. D., Downs, S. H., Downie, S. R., Marks, G. B., & Salome, C. M. (1999). Exhaled nitric oxide levels in atopic children - Relation to skin prick test-results. Respirology, 4(SUPPL. 1).

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-33746310423

Web Of Science Accession Number


Volume


  • 4

Issue


  • SUPPL. 1

Abstract


  • Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) is proposed as a measure of airway inflammation, but may be more strongly related to atopy than to asthma. Allergic sensitisation to house-dust mite and mould spores is a strong risk factor for asthma, whereas sensitisation to grass pollen is a weak or nonsignificant risk Aim: To determine if eNO levels are associated with sensitisation to specific allergens, rather than with a more general atopy. Methods: A sample of 312 atopic children, aged 9-13 years from Wagga Wagga and Moree had eNO measured, and a skin prick test to eight allergen in the winter, outside the pollen season. Expired air was collected in a 3L wine cask bag and the NO content measured by chemiluminescent analyser. At the skin prick test, a wheal size >3 mm was defined as positive. Results: The prevalence of sensitisation to house-dust mite was 61.27%, to Alternaria is 46.35%, to ryegrass pollen 50.48%, and to Cladosporium 25.4%. Univariate analyses showed an association between eNO and both the number of positive skin prick reactions (r=0.3, p<0.001) and maximum wheal size (r=0.189, p<0.01). However, using multiple linear regression, which took into account the wheal size for all allergen tests, only the size of the response to House-dust mite and Cladosporium were significant predictors of eNO (p<0.01). The number of positive skin prick reactions was not an independent predictor of eNO. Conclusion: In this sample of atopic children, high eNO levels were associated with allergic sensitisation to house-dust mite and Cladosporium, but not with sensitisation to grass pollens. House-dust mite and Cladosporium may be more likely to cause airway inflammation relevant to asthma.

Publication Date


  • 1999

Citation


  • Leuppi, J. D., Downs, S. H., Downie, S. R., Marks, G. B., & Salome, C. M. (1999). Exhaled nitric oxide levels in atopic children - Relation to skin prick test-results. Respirology, 4(SUPPL. 1).

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-33746310423

Web Of Science Accession Number


Volume


  • 4

Issue


  • SUPPL. 1