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Recent progress in genetics of schizophrenia

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The genetics of schizophrenia received excessive growth of interest and study during the last years. It became evident from family studies that schizophrenia is not transmitted as a distinct diagnostic entity. Instead, a broad continuum of behavioural deviations is aggregating in families, and minor deficiencies in attention and cognition in absence of lifetime diagnosis of any psychiatric disorder represents a more subtle variant. The patterns of familial aggregation is most compatible with a complex mode of transmission with multiple contributing genes which are putatively interacting. The application of efficient molecular-genetic techniques produced several findings on the genome with independent replications. Susceptibility genes are supposed to be localized in these regions and have to be identified. The multiplicity of suggestive regions showing linkage to schizophrenia argues against a single causal or major operating gene for schizophrenia. However, the observed strengths of linkage and association are very modest, and results of replication tests are inconsistent. While constellation is compatible with a complex mode of transmission and/or genetic heterogeneity, definite conclusions would be premature. Although it has been known since the inseminate work of Rudin, Kallmann and Luxenburger that schizophrenia is familial and determined by genetic factors, the nature of the familial genetic basis of schizophrenia remains obscure up to now. However, the application of advanced clinical epidemiological and laboratory tools promoted the field substantially, particularly during the last years. This overview summarizes a selection of new insights into the familial-genetic basis of schizophrenia.

Publication Date


  • 1996

Citation


  • Maier, W., Schwab, S., Franke, P., G��nsicke, M., & Rietschel, M. (1996). Recent progress in genetics of schizophrenia. Neurology Psychiatry and Brain Research, 4(3), 117-128.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0030428906

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 117

End Page


  • 128

Volume


  • 4

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • The genetics of schizophrenia received excessive growth of interest and study during the last years. It became evident from family studies that schizophrenia is not transmitted as a distinct diagnostic entity. Instead, a broad continuum of behavioural deviations is aggregating in families, and minor deficiencies in attention and cognition in absence of lifetime diagnosis of any psychiatric disorder represents a more subtle variant. The patterns of familial aggregation is most compatible with a complex mode of transmission with multiple contributing genes which are putatively interacting. The application of efficient molecular-genetic techniques produced several findings on the genome with independent replications. Susceptibility genes are supposed to be localized in these regions and have to be identified. The multiplicity of suggestive regions showing linkage to schizophrenia argues against a single causal or major operating gene for schizophrenia. However, the observed strengths of linkage and association are very modest, and results of replication tests are inconsistent. While constellation is compatible with a complex mode of transmission and/or genetic heterogeneity, definite conclusions would be premature. Although it has been known since the inseminate work of Rudin, Kallmann and Luxenburger that schizophrenia is familial and determined by genetic factors, the nature of the familial genetic basis of schizophrenia remains obscure up to now. However, the application of advanced clinical epidemiological and laboratory tools promoted the field substantially, particularly during the last years. This overview summarizes a selection of new insights into the familial-genetic basis of schizophrenia.

Publication Date


  • 1996

Citation


  • Maier, W., Schwab, S., Franke, P., G��nsicke, M., & Rietschel, M. (1996). Recent progress in genetics of schizophrenia. Neurology Psychiatry and Brain Research, 4(3), 117-128.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0030428906

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 117

End Page


  • 128

Volume


  • 4

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication