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Ground dwelling mammal response to fire: A case study from Monga National Park after the 2019/2020 Clyde Mountain fire

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Ground dwelling mammal communities are documented six months before and after the Clyde Mountain Wildfire of 2019/2020 in Monga National Park. Across eight sites before fire, approximately 12 ground dwelling mammal species were recorded. Survey effort post-fire increased to 40 sites, spanning three fire severity classes (low, moderate and extreme), revealed 16 ground dwelling mammal species. Species consist of small, medium and large native (one threatened species) and introduced mammals, though consistent with previous findings of ground dwelling mammal diversity in the area. Overall a greater number of species were found in low, compared to moderate and severe fire severity classes. Recovery and detection of mammals occurred in a shorter time period, again, in sites that experienced low, followed by moderate and extreme fire severity.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • Mikac, K. M., Knipler, M. L., Gracanin, A., & Newbery, M. S. (2021). Ground dwelling mammal response to fire: A case study from Monga National Park after the 2019/2020 Clyde Mountain fire. Austral Ecology. doi:10.1111/aec.13109

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85114478705

Abstract


  • Ground dwelling mammal communities are documented six months before and after the Clyde Mountain Wildfire of 2019/2020 in Monga National Park. Across eight sites before fire, approximately 12 ground dwelling mammal species were recorded. Survey effort post-fire increased to 40 sites, spanning three fire severity classes (low, moderate and extreme), revealed 16 ground dwelling mammal species. Species consist of small, medium and large native (one threatened species) and introduced mammals, though consistent with previous findings of ground dwelling mammal diversity in the area. Overall a greater number of species were found in low, compared to moderate and severe fire severity classes. Recovery and detection of mammals occurred in a shorter time period, again, in sites that experienced low, followed by moderate and extreme fire severity.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • Mikac, K. M., Knipler, M. L., Gracanin, A., & Newbery, M. S. (2021). Ground dwelling mammal response to fire: A case study from Monga National Park after the 2019/2020 Clyde Mountain fire. Austral Ecology. doi:10.1111/aec.13109

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85114478705