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Organising health care services for people with an acquired brain injury: An overview of systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Results: A total of five systematic reviews and 21 studies were included in the review; eight of the papers (31%) included people with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or ABI and the remaining papers (69%) included only participants with a diagnosis of stroke. We found evidence supporting the use of integrated care to improve functional outcome and reduce length of stay and evidence supporting early supported discharge teams for reducing morbidity and mortality and reducing length of stay for stroke survivors. There was little evidence to support case management or the use of integrated care pathways for people with ABI. We found evidence that a quality monitoring intervention can lead to improvements in process outcomes in acute and rehabilitation settings. We were unable to find any studies meeting our inclusion criteria regarding fee-for-service care or engaging consumers in the governance of the health care organisation.

UOW Authors


  •   Lannin, Natasha (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Laver, K., Lannin, N. A., Bragge, P., Hunter, P., Holland, A. E., Tavender, E., . . . Gruen, R. (2014). Organising health care services for people with an acquired brain injury: An overview of systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials. BMC Health Services Research, 14(1). doi:10.1186/1472-6963-14-397

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84910666242

Volume


  • 14

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • Results: A total of five systematic reviews and 21 studies were included in the review; eight of the papers (31%) included people with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or ABI and the remaining papers (69%) included only participants with a diagnosis of stroke. We found evidence supporting the use of integrated care to improve functional outcome and reduce length of stay and evidence supporting early supported discharge teams for reducing morbidity and mortality and reducing length of stay for stroke survivors. There was little evidence to support case management or the use of integrated care pathways for people with ABI. We found evidence that a quality monitoring intervention can lead to improvements in process outcomes in acute and rehabilitation settings. We were unable to find any studies meeting our inclusion criteria regarding fee-for-service care or engaging consumers in the governance of the health care organisation.

UOW Authors


  •   Lannin, Natasha (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Laver, K., Lannin, N. A., Bragge, P., Hunter, P., Holland, A. E., Tavender, E., . . . Gruen, R. (2014). Organising health care services for people with an acquired brain injury: An overview of systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials. BMC Health Services Research, 14(1). doi:10.1186/1472-6963-14-397

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84910666242

Volume


  • 14

Issue


  • 1