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Temporal trends in dancing among adults between 1994 and 2012: The Health Survey for England

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The benefits of physical activity are established, however, increasing population physical activity levels remains a challenge. Participating in activities that are enjoyable and multidimensional, such as dancing, are associated with better adherence. However, the extent to which the general population participates in dancing and its temporal trends has not been well studied. The aim of this study was to investigate temporal trends and patterns and correlates of dance participation in England from 1994 to 2012 using a series of large nationally representative surveys. We used data from the Health Survey for England 1994, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2012 to examine dance temporal trends. Temporal trends data were age-standardized and correlates of dance participation were examined for males and females over each study year. Changes in population prevalence of dance participation were determined using multiple logistical regression with 1997 as the reference year. Of all survey participants (n = 98,178) 7.8% (95%CI: 7.63���7.96) reported dance participation. There was a marked steady decrease over time, with the steepest decline from 2003 onwards. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratios for dance participation were 0.51 for males (95%CI 0.408���0.630, p < 0.001) and 0.69 for females (95%CI: 0.598���0.973, p < 0.001) in 2012 compared to 1997. Dance participation in adults in England has decreased markedly over time. This study suggests that dance is not being adequately utilized as a health enhancing physical activity, and therefore further research and resources should be dedicated to supporting dance in the community.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Vassallo, A. J., Hiller, C. E., Pappas, E., & Stamatakis, E. (2018). Temporal trends in dancing among adults between 1994 and 2012: The Health Survey for England. Preventive Medicine, 106, 200-208. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.11.005

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85034866898

Start Page


  • 200

End Page


  • 208

Volume


  • 106

Issue


Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • The benefits of physical activity are established, however, increasing population physical activity levels remains a challenge. Participating in activities that are enjoyable and multidimensional, such as dancing, are associated with better adherence. However, the extent to which the general population participates in dancing and its temporal trends has not been well studied. The aim of this study was to investigate temporal trends and patterns and correlates of dance participation in England from 1994 to 2012 using a series of large nationally representative surveys. We used data from the Health Survey for England 1994, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2012 to examine dance temporal trends. Temporal trends data were age-standardized and correlates of dance participation were examined for males and females over each study year. Changes in population prevalence of dance participation were determined using multiple logistical regression with 1997 as the reference year. Of all survey participants (n = 98,178) 7.8% (95%CI: 7.63���7.96) reported dance participation. There was a marked steady decrease over time, with the steepest decline from 2003 onwards. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratios for dance participation were 0.51 for males (95%CI 0.408���0.630, p < 0.001) and 0.69 for females (95%CI: 0.598���0.973, p < 0.001) in 2012 compared to 1997. Dance participation in adults in England has decreased markedly over time. This study suggests that dance is not being adequately utilized as a health enhancing physical activity, and therefore further research and resources should be dedicated to supporting dance in the community.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Vassallo, A. J., Hiller, C. E., Pappas, E., & Stamatakis, E. (2018). Temporal trends in dancing among adults between 1994 and 2012: The Health Survey for England. Preventive Medicine, 106, 200-208. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.11.005

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85034866898

Start Page


  • 200

End Page


  • 208

Volume


  • 106

Issue


Place Of Publication