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What are the clinical implications of knee crepitus to individuals with knee osteoarthritis? An observational study with data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Background: Crepitus is a common clinical feature of knee osteoarthritis. However, the importance of crepitus in the overall clinical presentation of individuals with knee osteoarthritis is unknown. Objective(s): (A) To compare function, pain and quality of life between individuals with knee osteoarthritis with and without crepitus; (B) to compare whether individuals with knee osteoarthritis in both knees, but crepitus in just one, differ in terms of function pain, and knee strength. Methods: Setting: Observational study. Participants: (A) A total of 584 participants with crepitus who had the same Kellgren���Lawrence grade on both knees were matched for gender, body mass index and Kellgren-Lawrence grade to participants without crepitus on both knees. (B) 361 participants with crepitus in only one knee and with the same Kellgren-Lawrence grade classification on both knees were included. Main outcome measure(s): A ��� Self-reported function, pain, quality of life, 20-m walk test and chair-stand test. B ���Knee extensor and flexor strength, self-reported function and pain. Results: A ��� Individuals with crepitus had lower self-reported function, quality of life and higher pain compared to those without crepitus (3���11%; small effect = 0.17���0.41, respectively). No difference was found in objective function between groups. B ��� Self-reported function was lower in the limb with crepitus compared to the limb without crepitus (15%; trivial effect = 0.09). No difference was found in pain and knee strength between-groups. Conclusion(s): Individuals with knee osteoarthritis and knee crepitus have slightly lower self-reported physical function and knee-related quality of life (small or trivial effect). However, the presence of knee crepitus is not associated with objective function or knee strength.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Pazzinatto, M. F., de Oliveira Silva, D., Faria, N. C., Simic, M., Ferreira, P. H., Azevedo, F. M. D., & Pappas, E. (2019). What are the clinical implications of knee crepitus to individuals with knee osteoarthritis? An observational study with data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 23(6), 491-496. doi:10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.11.001

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85057015069

Start Page


  • 491

End Page


  • 496

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Background: Crepitus is a common clinical feature of knee osteoarthritis. However, the importance of crepitus in the overall clinical presentation of individuals with knee osteoarthritis is unknown. Objective(s): (A) To compare function, pain and quality of life between individuals with knee osteoarthritis with and without crepitus; (B) to compare whether individuals with knee osteoarthritis in both knees, but crepitus in just one, differ in terms of function pain, and knee strength. Methods: Setting: Observational study. Participants: (A) A total of 584 participants with crepitus who had the same Kellgren���Lawrence grade on both knees were matched for gender, body mass index and Kellgren-Lawrence grade to participants without crepitus on both knees. (B) 361 participants with crepitus in only one knee and with the same Kellgren-Lawrence grade classification on both knees were included. Main outcome measure(s): A ��� Self-reported function, pain, quality of life, 20-m walk test and chair-stand test. B ���Knee extensor and flexor strength, self-reported function and pain. Results: A ��� Individuals with crepitus had lower self-reported function, quality of life and higher pain compared to those without crepitus (3���11%; small effect = 0.17���0.41, respectively). No difference was found in objective function between groups. B ��� Self-reported function was lower in the limb with crepitus compared to the limb without crepitus (15%; trivial effect = 0.09). No difference was found in pain and knee strength between-groups. Conclusion(s): Individuals with knee osteoarthritis and knee crepitus have slightly lower self-reported physical function and knee-related quality of life (small or trivial effect). However, the presence of knee crepitus is not associated with objective function or knee strength.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Pazzinatto, M. F., de Oliveira Silva, D., Faria, N. C., Simic, M., Ferreira, P. H., Azevedo, F. M. D., & Pappas, E. (2019). What are the clinical implications of knee crepitus to individuals with knee osteoarthritis? An observational study with data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 23(6), 491-496. doi:10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.11.001

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85057015069

Start Page


  • 491

End Page


  • 496

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication