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The effect of knee braces on tibial rotation in anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knees during high-demand athletic activities

Journal Article


Abstract


  • OBJECTIVE: To examine if bracing can restrict tibial rotation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient patients during high loading activities. DESIGN: Repeated measures. Kinematic data were collected with an 8-camera Vicon system while each patient performed 2 tasks that are known to cause increased rotational and translational loads on the knee: (1) descending from a stair and subsequent pivoting, and (2) landing from a platform and subsequent pivoting. The tasks were repeated under 3 brace conditions for the ACL-deficient knee: (1) wearing a prophylactic brace (braced condition), (2) wearing a patellofemoral brace (sleeved condition), and (3) without brace (unbraced condition). SETTING: Biomechanical laboratory study. PATIENTS: Twenty-one male subjects with a confirmed unilateral ACL rupture were assessed in vivo. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tibial internal rotation. Two repeated measures ANOVAs tested for differences in tibial internal rotation among the 3 conditions of the ACL-deficient knee and the unbraced condition of the intact knee. RESULTS: In both tasks, tibial rotation was significantly lower in the intact knee compared with all 3 conditions of the ACL-deficient knee (P ��� 0.031). Bracing the ACL-deficient knee resulted in lower rotation than the unbraced (P ��� 0.001) and sleeved (P ��� 0.033) conditions. The sleeved condition resulted in lower tibial rotation in the drop landing and pivoting task compared with the unbraced condition (P = 0.019) but not in the stair descending and pivoting task (P = 0.256). CONCLUSIONS: Bracing decreased the excessive tibial rotation in ACL-deficient patients during high-demand activities but failed to fully restore normative values. If knee braces can enhance rotational knee stability in ACL-deficient patients, then they could possibly play an important role in preventing further knee pathology in such patients. Copyright �� 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Giotis, D., Zampeli, F., Pappas, E., Mitsionis, G., Papadopoulos, P., & Georgoulis, A. D. (2013). The effect of knee braces on tibial rotation in anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knees during high-demand athletic activities. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 23(4), 287-292. doi:10.1097/JSM.0b013e31827ee800

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84879878953

Start Page


  • 287

End Page


  • 292

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • OBJECTIVE: To examine if bracing can restrict tibial rotation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient patients during high loading activities. DESIGN: Repeated measures. Kinematic data were collected with an 8-camera Vicon system while each patient performed 2 tasks that are known to cause increased rotational and translational loads on the knee: (1) descending from a stair and subsequent pivoting, and (2) landing from a platform and subsequent pivoting. The tasks were repeated under 3 brace conditions for the ACL-deficient knee: (1) wearing a prophylactic brace (braced condition), (2) wearing a patellofemoral brace (sleeved condition), and (3) without brace (unbraced condition). SETTING: Biomechanical laboratory study. PATIENTS: Twenty-one male subjects with a confirmed unilateral ACL rupture were assessed in vivo. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tibial internal rotation. Two repeated measures ANOVAs tested for differences in tibial internal rotation among the 3 conditions of the ACL-deficient knee and the unbraced condition of the intact knee. RESULTS: In both tasks, tibial rotation was significantly lower in the intact knee compared with all 3 conditions of the ACL-deficient knee (P ��� 0.031). Bracing the ACL-deficient knee resulted in lower rotation than the unbraced (P ��� 0.001) and sleeved (P ��� 0.033) conditions. The sleeved condition resulted in lower tibial rotation in the drop landing and pivoting task compared with the unbraced condition (P = 0.019) but not in the stair descending and pivoting task (P = 0.256). CONCLUSIONS: Bracing decreased the excessive tibial rotation in ACL-deficient patients during high-demand activities but failed to fully restore normative values. If knee braces can enhance rotational knee stability in ACL-deficient patients, then they could possibly play an important role in preventing further knee pathology in such patients. Copyright �� 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Giotis, D., Zampeli, F., Pappas, E., Mitsionis, G., Papadopoulos, P., & Georgoulis, A. D. (2013). The effect of knee braces on tibial rotation in anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knees during high-demand athletic activities. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 23(4), 287-292. doi:10.1097/JSM.0b013e31827ee800

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84879878953

Start Page


  • 287

End Page


  • 292

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication