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Replace and repair: Biomimetic bioprinting for effective muscle engineering

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The debilitating effects of muscle damage, either through ischemic injury or volumetric muscle loss (VML), can have significant impacts on patients, and yet there are few effective treatments. This challenge arises when function is degraded due to significant amounts of skeletal muscle loss, beyond the regenerative ability of endogenous repair mechanisms. Currently available surgical interventions for VML are quite invasive and cannot typically restore function adequately. In response to this, many new bioengineering studies implicate 3D bioprinting as a viable option. Bioprinting for VML repair includes three distinct phases: printing and seeding, growth and maturation, and implantation and application. Although this 3D bioprinting technology has existed for several decades, the advent of more advanced and novel printing techniques has brought us closer to clinical applications. Recent studies have overcome previous limitations in diffusion distance with novel microchannel construct architectures and improved myotubule alignment with highly biomimetic nanostructures. These structures may also enhance angiogenic and nervous ingrowth post-implantation, though further research to improve these parameters has been limited. Inclusion of neural cells has also shown to improve myoblast maturation and development of neuromuscular junctions, bringing us one step closer to functional, implantable skeletal muscle constructs. Given the current state of skeletal muscle 3D bioprinting, the most pressing future avenues of research include furthering our understanding of the physical and biochemical mechanisms of myotube development and expanding our control over macroscopic and microscopic construct structures. Further to this, current investigation needs to be expanded from immunocompromised rodent and murine myoblast models to more clinically applicable human cell lines as we move closer to viable therapeutic implementation.

UOW Authors


Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • Blake, C., Massey, O., Boyd-Moss, M., Firipis, K., Rifai, A., Franks, S., . . . Williams, R. J. (2021). Replace and repair: Biomimetic bioprinting for effective muscle engineering. APL Bioengineering, 5(3). doi:10.1063/5.0040764

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85109417429

Web Of Science Accession Number


Volume


  • 5

Issue


  • 3

Abstract


  • The debilitating effects of muscle damage, either through ischemic injury or volumetric muscle loss (VML), can have significant impacts on patients, and yet there are few effective treatments. This challenge arises when function is degraded due to significant amounts of skeletal muscle loss, beyond the regenerative ability of endogenous repair mechanisms. Currently available surgical interventions for VML are quite invasive and cannot typically restore function adequately. In response to this, many new bioengineering studies implicate 3D bioprinting as a viable option. Bioprinting for VML repair includes three distinct phases: printing and seeding, growth and maturation, and implantation and application. Although this 3D bioprinting technology has existed for several decades, the advent of more advanced and novel printing techniques has brought us closer to clinical applications. Recent studies have overcome previous limitations in diffusion distance with novel microchannel construct architectures and improved myotubule alignment with highly biomimetic nanostructures. These structures may also enhance angiogenic and nervous ingrowth post-implantation, though further research to improve these parameters has been limited. Inclusion of neural cells has also shown to improve myoblast maturation and development of neuromuscular junctions, bringing us one step closer to functional, implantable skeletal muscle constructs. Given the current state of skeletal muscle 3D bioprinting, the most pressing future avenues of research include furthering our understanding of the physical and biochemical mechanisms of myotube development and expanding our control over macroscopic and microscopic construct structures. Further to this, current investigation needs to be expanded from immunocompromised rodent and murine myoblast models to more clinically applicable human cell lines as we move closer to viable therapeutic implementation.

UOW Authors


Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • Blake, C., Massey, O., Boyd-Moss, M., Firipis, K., Rifai, A., Franks, S., . . . Williams, R. J. (2021). Replace and repair: Biomimetic bioprinting for effective muscle engineering. APL Bioengineering, 5(3). doi:10.1063/5.0040764

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85109417429

Web Of Science Accession Number


Volume


  • 5

Issue


  • 3