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The digital revolution in higher education: Rhetoric and reality

Chapter


Abstract


  • This chapter explores how efforts to integrate technology into higher education can be explored through sociological concepts. The digital revolution in higher education has become synonymous with innovation and improvement across the institution, but most prominently in teaching and learning. The chapter examines how sociological concepts have already been useful in understanding whether students are digital natives. Proponents argued for more student-centred forms, for example through interactive multimedia to support open-ended, authentic learning experiences and new types of assessment. Young people growing up in middle-income households, particularly with parents in professional occupations, experience technology as a tool for work and business, as well as leisure. It then discusses the instrumental/expressive distinction to highlight some of the inherent challenges in implementing technology in higher education, using social media and Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) as particular examples. Finally, the chapter closes with a discussion of the implications for practice and research.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Bennett, S. (2016). The digital revolution in higher education: Rhetoric and reality. In Routledge Handbook of the Sociology of Higher Education (pp. 328-337). doi:10.4324/9781315772233-29

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781138778122

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85071942471

Web Of Science Accession Number


Book Title


  • Routledge Handbook of the Sociology of Higher Education

Start Page


  • 328

End Page


  • 337

Abstract


  • This chapter explores how efforts to integrate technology into higher education can be explored through sociological concepts. The digital revolution in higher education has become synonymous with innovation and improvement across the institution, but most prominently in teaching and learning. The chapter examines how sociological concepts have already been useful in understanding whether students are digital natives. Proponents argued for more student-centred forms, for example through interactive multimedia to support open-ended, authentic learning experiences and new types of assessment. Young people growing up in middle-income households, particularly with parents in professional occupations, experience technology as a tool for work and business, as well as leisure. It then discusses the instrumental/expressive distinction to highlight some of the inherent challenges in implementing technology in higher education, using social media and Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) as particular examples. Finally, the chapter closes with a discussion of the implications for practice and research.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Bennett, S. (2016). The digital revolution in higher education: Rhetoric and reality. In Routledge Handbook of the Sociology of Higher Education (pp. 328-337). doi:10.4324/9781315772233-29

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781138778122

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85071942471

Web Of Science Accession Number


Book Title


  • Routledge Handbook of the Sociology of Higher Education

Start Page


  • 328

End Page


  • 337