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national symposium for japanese language education

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Underscoring a series of government initiatives promoting language education in Australia and New Zealand, particularly Asian language education, is the presumption that the study of a language will lead to greater employment opportunities. Anecdotal evidence suggests that some university Japanese language learners anticipate using their Japanese language skills in the workplace and/or that their language skills will help them gain employment. Yet, no research specifically addresses these questions.This article discusses the results of a 2017 online survey of graduates of Japanese language from Australian and New Zealand universities between 1997 and 2016. Responses were received from 67 graduates, 60 of whom had used their language skills in at least one role post graduation. In almost 30% of cases this role was located in Japan. The discussion covers the degrees completed by all respondents, the reason(s) why they studied Japanese at university and whether they expected to use their language skills in the workplace at the time of graduation. Interestingly, improved employment opportunities was not the primary reason for graduates studying Japanese. Discussion also covers the specific language skills used, as well as the regularity of use. Discussion of spoken skills also covers the level of skill used. The results show that spoken skills are the most commonly used skill in the workplace, followed by reading and writing. Almost 80% of graduates who used their spoken skills did so at the basic or advanced level, and almost 74% used their spoken skills on a daily basis.A number of graduates’ comments on the use of Japanese language skills in the workplace are also discussed. Graduates recommend that language students undertake professional/technical studies in addition to their language studies. The results have implications for careers advisers, university marketers and degree administrators.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • Ward, R. (2021). national symposium for japanese language education. In R. Spence-Brown (Ed.), https://nsjle.org.au/proceedings/#2018-proceedings (pp. 83-94). Sydney Australia. Retrieved from https://nsjle.org.au/nsjle/media/2018-NSJLE-Ward.pdf

Web Of Science Accession Number


Number Of Pages


  • 12

Start Page


  • 83

End Page


  • 94

Place Of Publication


  • Sydney Australia

Abstract


  • Underscoring a series of government initiatives promoting language education in Australia and New Zealand, particularly Asian language education, is the presumption that the study of a language will lead to greater employment opportunities. Anecdotal evidence suggests that some university Japanese language learners anticipate using their Japanese language skills in the workplace and/or that their language skills will help them gain employment. Yet, no research specifically addresses these questions.This article discusses the results of a 2017 online survey of graduates of Japanese language from Australian and New Zealand universities between 1997 and 2016. Responses were received from 67 graduates, 60 of whom had used their language skills in at least one role post graduation. In almost 30% of cases this role was located in Japan. The discussion covers the degrees completed by all respondents, the reason(s) why they studied Japanese at university and whether they expected to use their language skills in the workplace at the time of graduation. Interestingly, improved employment opportunities was not the primary reason for graduates studying Japanese. Discussion also covers the specific language skills used, as well as the regularity of use. Discussion of spoken skills also covers the level of skill used. The results show that spoken skills are the most commonly used skill in the workplace, followed by reading and writing. Almost 80% of graduates who used their spoken skills did so at the basic or advanced level, and almost 74% used their spoken skills on a daily basis.A number of graduates’ comments on the use of Japanese language skills in the workplace are also discussed. Graduates recommend that language students undertake professional/technical studies in addition to their language studies. The results have implications for careers advisers, university marketers and degree administrators.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • Ward, R. (2021). national symposium for japanese language education. In R. Spence-Brown (Ed.), https://nsjle.org.au/proceedings/#2018-proceedings (pp. 83-94). Sydney Australia. Retrieved from https://nsjle.org.au/nsjle/media/2018-NSJLE-Ward.pdf

Web Of Science Accession Number


Number Of Pages


  • 12

Start Page


  • 83

End Page


  • 94

Place Of Publication


  • Sydney Australia