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A Molecular-Cage Strategy Enabling Efficient Chemisorption���Electrocatalytic Interface in Nanostructured Li2S Cathode for Li Metal-Free Rechargeable Cells with High Energy

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Using high-capacity and metallic Li-free lithium sulfide (Li2S) cathodes offers an alternative solution to address serious safety risks and performance decay caused by uncontrolled dendrite hazards of Li metal anodes in next-generation Li metal batteries. Practical applications of such a cathode, however, still suffer from low redox activity, unaffordable cost, and poor processability of infusible and moisture-sensitive Li2S. Herein, these difficulties are addressed by developing a molecular cage���engaged strategy that enables low-cost production and interfacial engineering of Li2S cathodes for rechargeable Li2S//Si cells. An efficient chemisorption���electrocatalytic interface is built in extremely nanostructured Li2S cathodes by harnessing the confinement/separation effect of metal���organic molecular cages on ionic clusters of air-stable, soluble, and low-cost Li salt and their chemical transformation. It effectively boosts the redox activity toward Li2S activation/dissociation and polysulfide chemisorption���conversion in Li-S batteries, leading to low activation voltage barrier, stable cycle life of 1000 cycles, ultrafast current rate up to 8 C, and high areal capacities of Li2S cathodes with high mass loading. Encouragingly, this highly active Li2S cathode can be applied for constructing truly workable Li2S//Si cells with a high specific energy of 673 Wh kg���1 and stable performance for 200 cycles at high rates against hollow nanostructured Si anode.

UOW Authors


  •   Zhou, Si (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Yu, M., Zhou, S., Wang, Z., Pei, W., Liu, X., Liu, C., . . . Qiu, J. (2019). A Molecular-Cage Strategy Enabling Efficient Chemisorption���Electrocatalytic Interface in Nanostructured Li2S Cathode for Li Metal-Free Rechargeable Cells with High Energy. Advanced Functional Materials, 29(46). doi:10.1002/adfm.201905986

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85071465564

Volume


  • 29

Issue


  • 46

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Using high-capacity and metallic Li-free lithium sulfide (Li2S) cathodes offers an alternative solution to address serious safety risks and performance decay caused by uncontrolled dendrite hazards of Li metal anodes in next-generation Li metal batteries. Practical applications of such a cathode, however, still suffer from low redox activity, unaffordable cost, and poor processability of infusible and moisture-sensitive Li2S. Herein, these difficulties are addressed by developing a molecular cage���engaged strategy that enables low-cost production and interfacial engineering of Li2S cathodes for rechargeable Li2S//Si cells. An efficient chemisorption���electrocatalytic interface is built in extremely nanostructured Li2S cathodes by harnessing the confinement/separation effect of metal���organic molecular cages on ionic clusters of air-stable, soluble, and low-cost Li salt and their chemical transformation. It effectively boosts the redox activity toward Li2S activation/dissociation and polysulfide chemisorption���conversion in Li-S batteries, leading to low activation voltage barrier, stable cycle life of 1000 cycles, ultrafast current rate up to 8 C, and high areal capacities of Li2S cathodes with high mass loading. Encouragingly, this highly active Li2S cathode can be applied for constructing truly workable Li2S//Si cells with a high specific energy of 673 Wh kg���1 and stable performance for 200 cycles at high rates against hollow nanostructured Si anode.

UOW Authors


  •   Zhou, Si (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Yu, M., Zhou, S., Wang, Z., Pei, W., Liu, X., Liu, C., . . . Qiu, J. (2019). A Molecular-Cage Strategy Enabling Efficient Chemisorption���Electrocatalytic Interface in Nanostructured Li2S Cathode for Li Metal-Free Rechargeable Cells with High Energy. Advanced Functional Materials, 29(46). doi:10.1002/adfm.201905986

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85071465564

Volume


  • 29

Issue


  • 46

Place Of Publication