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Documentary and resistance: There Goes Our Neighbourhood, #WeLiveHere2017 and the Waterloo estate redevelopment

Journal Article


Abstract


  • This paper is about a documentary that formed one component of a project to draw attention to and contest the redevelopment of Sydney���s Waterloo public housing estate. There Goes Our Neighbourhood is a strategic impact documentary that chronicles residents��� efforts to resist or reshape the redevelopment project. It was part of, and followed, the #WeLiveHere2017 campaign���a campaign which also involved the collective production of a protest artwork via the illumination of two towers with LED lights, and digital storytelling via social media. Following reflections from both the filmmaker and a participant in the campaign, we interrogate the impacts of There Goes Our Neighbourhood, including how it challenges the stigmatisation of public housing tenants and estates, and critically discuss the producers��� approach to engaging different audiences and navigating competing interests. We conclude by suggesting that while There Goes Our Neighbourhood and #WeLiveHere2017 may not have changed the course of the redevelopment, they have had���and may yet have���positive impacts in other ways.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Chatterjee, P., Sisson, A., Condie, J., Wynne, L., Lewis, C., & Skipper, C. (2022). Documentary and resistance: There Goes Our Neighbourhood, #WeLiveHere2017 and the Waterloo estate redevelopment. International Journal of Housing Policy, 22(3), 329-350. doi:10.1080/19491247.2020.1851636

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85100707719

Start Page


  • 329

End Page


  • 350

Volume


  • 22

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • This paper is about a documentary that formed one component of a project to draw attention to and contest the redevelopment of Sydney���s Waterloo public housing estate. There Goes Our Neighbourhood is a strategic impact documentary that chronicles residents��� efforts to resist or reshape the redevelopment project. It was part of, and followed, the #WeLiveHere2017 campaign���a campaign which also involved the collective production of a protest artwork via the illumination of two towers with LED lights, and digital storytelling via social media. Following reflections from both the filmmaker and a participant in the campaign, we interrogate the impacts of There Goes Our Neighbourhood, including how it challenges the stigmatisation of public housing tenants and estates, and critically discuss the producers��� approach to engaging different audiences and navigating competing interests. We conclude by suggesting that while There Goes Our Neighbourhood and #WeLiveHere2017 may not have changed the course of the redevelopment, they have had���and may yet have���positive impacts in other ways.

Publication Date


  • 2022

Citation


  • Chatterjee, P., Sisson, A., Condie, J., Wynne, L., Lewis, C., & Skipper, C. (2022). Documentary and resistance: There Goes Our Neighbourhood, #WeLiveHere2017 and the Waterloo estate redevelopment. International Journal of Housing Policy, 22(3), 329-350. doi:10.1080/19491247.2020.1851636

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85100707719

Start Page


  • 329

End Page


  • 350

Volume


  • 22

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication