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Riding the rural radio wave: The impact of a community-led drug and alcohol radio advertising campaign in a remote Australian Aboriginal community

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Objective: Aboriginal people experience a higher burden of disease as a consequence of drug and alcohol (D&A) abuse. Although media campaigns can be a popular tool for disseminating health promotion messages, evidence of the extent to which they reduce the impact of substance abuse is limited, especially for rural Aboriginal communities. This paper is the first to examine the impact a locally designed D&A radio advertising campaign for Aboriginal people in a remote community in Western NSW. Design: A post-intervention evaluation. Setting: The radio campaign was implemented in Bourke, (population 2465, 30% Aboriginal). Participants: Fifty-three community surveys were completed. Main outcome measure(s): The self-reported level of awareness of the campaign and the number of self-referrals to local D&A workers in the intervention period. Results: Most respondents (79%) reported they listen to radio on a daily basis, with 75% reporting that they had heard one or more of the advertisements. The advertisement that was remembered best contained the voice of a respected, local person. There was one self-referral to local health services during the intervention timeframe. Conclusion: The community-led radio advertising campaign increased community awareness of substance abuse harms, but had limited impact on formal help-seeking. This paper highlights the value of radio as a commonly used, trusted and culturally relevant health promotion medium for rural communities, especially when engaging local respected Aboriginal presenters.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Munro, A., Allan, J., Shakeshaft, A., & Snijder, M. (2017). Riding the rural radio wave: The impact of a community-led drug and alcohol radio advertising campaign in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Australian Journal of Rural Health, 25(5), 290-297. doi:10.1111/ajr.12345

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85013790643

Start Page


  • 290

End Page


  • 297

Volume


  • 25

Issue


  • 5

Abstract


  • Objective: Aboriginal people experience a higher burden of disease as a consequence of drug and alcohol (D&A) abuse. Although media campaigns can be a popular tool for disseminating health promotion messages, evidence of the extent to which they reduce the impact of substance abuse is limited, especially for rural Aboriginal communities. This paper is the first to examine the impact a locally designed D&A radio advertising campaign for Aboriginal people in a remote community in Western NSW. Design: A post-intervention evaluation. Setting: The radio campaign was implemented in Bourke, (population 2465, 30% Aboriginal). Participants: Fifty-three community surveys were completed. Main outcome measure(s): The self-reported level of awareness of the campaign and the number of self-referrals to local D&A workers in the intervention period. Results: Most respondents (79%) reported they listen to radio on a daily basis, with 75% reporting that they had heard one or more of the advertisements. The advertisement that was remembered best contained the voice of a respected, local person. There was one self-referral to local health services during the intervention timeframe. Conclusion: The community-led radio advertising campaign increased community awareness of substance abuse harms, but had limited impact on formal help-seeking. This paper highlights the value of radio as a commonly used, trusted and culturally relevant health promotion medium for rural communities, especially when engaging local respected Aboriginal presenters.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Munro, A., Allan, J., Shakeshaft, A., & Snijder, M. (2017). Riding the rural radio wave: The impact of a community-led drug and alcohol radio advertising campaign in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Australian Journal of Rural Health, 25(5), 290-297. doi:10.1111/ajr.12345

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85013790643

Start Page


  • 290

End Page


  • 297

Volume


  • 25

Issue


  • 5