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A new 36Cl hydrological model and 36Cl systematics in the Jordan River/Dead Sea system

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The recent breakthrough in our ability to detect the radioactive isotope 36Cl (half-life T1/2 = 301,000 yr) at natural levels by accelerator mass spectrometry1 allows the processes of salination of water systems to be studied in a new way by distinguishing the chloride content originating in young rainwaters and their subsequent evaporation from that generated by the leaching of ancient rocks. Results for the Jordan River/Dead Sea system show that the amount of chloride leached from rocks ranges from ∼70% in source springs to >90% in water bodies downstream. Furthermore, the amount of water left after evaporation decreases from ∼50% in the source springs to 20% in the intermediate Lake Kinneret. In the terminal Dead Sea, 99% of the stable chloride originates from ancient rocks and evaporite formations while ∼80% of its 36Cl content is of meteoric origin. Using 36Cl measurements, we estimate the accumulation time of the Dead Sea salt to be 19,000-25,000 yr. © 1986 Nature Publishing Group.

UOW Authors


  •   Fink, David (external author)

Publication Date


  • 1986

Published In


Citation


  • Paul, M., Kaufman, A., Magaritz, M., Fink, D., Henning, W., Kaim, R., . . . Meirav, O. (1986). A new 36Cl hydrological model and 36Cl systematics in the Jordan River/Dead Sea system. Nature, 321(6069), 511-515. doi:10.1038/321511a0

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0022554644

Start Page


  • 511

End Page


  • 515

Volume


  • 321

Issue


  • 6069

Abstract


  • The recent breakthrough in our ability to detect the radioactive isotope 36Cl (half-life T1/2 = 301,000 yr) at natural levels by accelerator mass spectrometry1 allows the processes of salination of water systems to be studied in a new way by distinguishing the chloride content originating in young rainwaters and their subsequent evaporation from that generated by the leaching of ancient rocks. Results for the Jordan River/Dead Sea system show that the amount of chloride leached from rocks ranges from ∼70% in source springs to >90% in water bodies downstream. Furthermore, the amount of water left after evaporation decreases from ∼50% in the source springs to 20% in the intermediate Lake Kinneret. In the terminal Dead Sea, 99% of the stable chloride originates from ancient rocks and evaporite formations while ∼80% of its 36Cl content is of meteoric origin. Using 36Cl measurements, we estimate the accumulation time of the Dead Sea salt to be 19,000-25,000 yr. © 1986 Nature Publishing Group.

UOW Authors


  •   Fink, David (external author)

Publication Date


  • 1986

Published In


Citation


  • Paul, M., Kaufman, A., Magaritz, M., Fink, D., Henning, W., Kaim, R., . . . Meirav, O. (1986). A new 36Cl hydrological model and 36Cl systematics in the Jordan River/Dead Sea system. Nature, 321(6069), 511-515. doi:10.1038/321511a0

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0022554644

Start Page


  • 511

End Page


  • 515

Volume


  • 321

Issue


  • 6069