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Antifouling Strategies for Electrochemical Biosensing: Mechanisms and Performance toward Point of Care Based Diagnostic Applications

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Although there exist numerous established laboratory-based technologies for sample diagnostics and analyte detection, many medical and forensic science applications require point of care based platforms for rapid on-the-spot sample analysis. Electrochemical biosensors provide a promising avenue for such applications due to the portability and functional simplicity of the technology. However, the ability to develop such platforms with the high sensitivity and selectivity required for analysis of low analyte concentrations in complex biological samples remains a paramount issue in the field of biosensing. Nonspecific adsorption, or fouling, at the electrode interface via the innumerable biomolecules present in these sample types (i.e., serum, urine, blood/plasma, and saliva) can drastically obstruct electrochemical performance, increasing background "noise"and diminishing both the electrochemical signal magnitude and specificity of the biosensor. Consequently, this review aims to discuss strategies and concepts used throughout the literature to prevent electrode surface fouling in biosensors and to communicate the nature of the antifouling mechanisms by which they operate. Evaluation of each antifouling strategy is focused primarily on the fabrication method, experimental technique, sample composition, and electrochemical performance of each technology highlighting the overall feasibility of the platform for point of care based diagnostic/detection applications.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • Russo, M. J., Han, M., Desroches, P. E., Manasa, C. S., Dennaoui, J., Quigley, A. F., . . . Silva, S. M. (2021). Antifouling Strategies for Electrochemical Biosensing: Mechanisms and Performance toward Point of Care Based Diagnostic Applications. ACS Sensors, 6(4), 1482-1507. doi:10.1021/acssensors.1c00390

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85105692973

Start Page


  • 1482

End Page


  • 1507

Volume


  • 6

Issue


  • 4

Abstract


  • Although there exist numerous established laboratory-based technologies for sample diagnostics and analyte detection, many medical and forensic science applications require point of care based platforms for rapid on-the-spot sample analysis. Electrochemical biosensors provide a promising avenue for such applications due to the portability and functional simplicity of the technology. However, the ability to develop such platforms with the high sensitivity and selectivity required for analysis of low analyte concentrations in complex biological samples remains a paramount issue in the field of biosensing. Nonspecific adsorption, or fouling, at the electrode interface via the innumerable biomolecules present in these sample types (i.e., serum, urine, blood/plasma, and saliva) can drastically obstruct electrochemical performance, increasing background "noise"and diminishing both the electrochemical signal magnitude and specificity of the biosensor. Consequently, this review aims to discuss strategies and concepts used throughout the literature to prevent electrode surface fouling in biosensors and to communicate the nature of the antifouling mechanisms by which they operate. Evaluation of each antifouling strategy is focused primarily on the fabrication method, experimental technique, sample composition, and electrochemical performance of each technology highlighting the overall feasibility of the platform for point of care based diagnostic/detection applications.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • Russo, M. J., Han, M., Desroches, P. E., Manasa, C. S., Dennaoui, J., Quigley, A. F., . . . Silva, S. M. (2021). Antifouling Strategies for Electrochemical Biosensing: Mechanisms and Performance toward Point of Care Based Diagnostic Applications. ACS Sensors, 6(4), 1482-1507. doi:10.1021/acssensors.1c00390

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85105692973

Start Page


  • 1482

End Page


  • 1507

Volume


  • 6

Issue


  • 4