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Nurturing relationships: The gardens of Greek and Vietnamese migrants in Marrickville, Sydney

Journal Article


Abstract


  • First- and second-generation migrants represent about 40 per cent of the Australian population. With such a large and also diverse immigrant population, urban landscapes are significantly shaped by the gardens created by migrants. Two groups of Vietnamese and Greek migrants, in the inner suburb of Marrickville South in Sydney, were interviewed to examine the relationship between migration history and garden-making practices. Garden composition was influenced by migrants' relationship with their homeland, in terms of length of time since migration, previous garden ownership, reason for migration and desire for cultural continuity, and by the size of the garden. Gardens also varied according to country of migration. The actual garden produce and type of environment created by the garden helped to emphasise and maintain cultural relationships, provide a space of nostalgia, and give a sense of ownership and control.

Publication Date


  • 2006

Citation


  • Graham, S., & Connell, J. (2006). Nurturing relationships: The gardens of Greek and Vietnamese migrants in Marrickville, Sydney. Australian Geographer, 37(3), 375-393. doi:10.1080/00049180600954799

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-33750341598

Start Page


  • 375

End Page


  • 393

Volume


  • 37

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • First- and second-generation migrants represent about 40 per cent of the Australian population. With such a large and also diverse immigrant population, urban landscapes are significantly shaped by the gardens created by migrants. Two groups of Vietnamese and Greek migrants, in the inner suburb of Marrickville South in Sydney, were interviewed to examine the relationship between migration history and garden-making practices. Garden composition was influenced by migrants' relationship with their homeland, in terms of length of time since migration, previous garden ownership, reason for migration and desire for cultural continuity, and by the size of the garden. Gardens also varied according to country of migration. The actual garden produce and type of environment created by the garden helped to emphasise and maintain cultural relationships, provide a space of nostalgia, and give a sense of ownership and control.

Publication Date


  • 2006

Citation


  • Graham, S., & Connell, J. (2006). Nurturing relationships: The gardens of Greek and Vietnamese migrants in Marrickville, Sydney. Australian Geographer, 37(3), 375-393. doi:10.1080/00049180600954799

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-33750341598

Start Page


  • 375

End Page


  • 393

Volume


  • 37

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication