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Climatic drivers of revegetation management practices in Australia: Analysis of a social survey

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Investment in small and large-scale revegetation in Australia is growing in response to concerns regarding the sustainability and productivity of agricultural landscapes. Site preparation and management - such as soil cultivation, weed control, fertilising, mulching, use of treeguards and watering - are major costs associated with small-scale revegetation. The aim of this study has been to investigate local revegetation knowledge and practices to determine the usefulness of each management practice for achieving success and to determine whether some practices are more suited to particular climatic zones. A national online revegetation survey was conducted to ascertain current small-scale revegetation practices and the factors that drive these choices. Management practices were found to be strongly associated with climate. Mulch, fertiliser, weed control and watering were applied more frequently in higher rainfall and higher temperature zones. Soil cultivation and treeguards were used more frequently in lower rainfall and lower temperature zones. These findings suggest that there may be some benefit in modifying existing revegetation guidelines to reflect climatic zones and management flexibility. © 2008 Steve Harrison, John Herbohn.

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Graham, S., McGinness, H. M., O'Connell, D. A., & Nicholls, A. O. (2008). Climatic drivers of revegetation management practices in Australia: Analysis of a social survey. Small-scale Forestry, 7(2), 183-203. doi:10.1007/s11842-008-9049-z

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-70649109160

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 183

End Page


  • 203

Volume


  • 7

Issue


  • 2

Abstract


  • Investment in small and large-scale revegetation in Australia is growing in response to concerns regarding the sustainability and productivity of agricultural landscapes. Site preparation and management - such as soil cultivation, weed control, fertilising, mulching, use of treeguards and watering - are major costs associated with small-scale revegetation. The aim of this study has been to investigate local revegetation knowledge and practices to determine the usefulness of each management practice for achieving success and to determine whether some practices are more suited to particular climatic zones. A national online revegetation survey was conducted to ascertain current small-scale revegetation practices and the factors that drive these choices. Management practices were found to be strongly associated with climate. Mulch, fertiliser, weed control and watering were applied more frequently in higher rainfall and higher temperature zones. Soil cultivation and treeguards were used more frequently in lower rainfall and lower temperature zones. These findings suggest that there may be some benefit in modifying existing revegetation guidelines to reflect climatic zones and management flexibility. © 2008 Steve Harrison, John Herbohn.

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Graham, S., McGinness, H. M., O'Connell, D. A., & Nicholls, A. O. (2008). Climatic drivers of revegetation management practices in Australia: Analysis of a social survey. Small-scale Forestry, 7(2), 183-203. doi:10.1007/s11842-008-9049-z

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-70649109160

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 183

End Page


  • 203

Volume


  • 7

Issue


  • 2