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Late Quaternary evolution of Lake Urana, New South Wales, Australia

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Lake Urana is a well‐preserved relict lake in the semi‐arid Riverine Plain of southeastern Australia. A compound lunette at its eastern shoreline consists of a quartz‐sand‐dominated unit (Bimbadeen Formation), thermoluminescence (TL) dated at 30 ka to 12 ka, and a clay and sand facies unit (Coonong Formation), dated at 55 ka to 35 ka. The intervening period indicates a phase of periodically exposed lake floor and soil formation. The older wet phase conforms well with similar environments recorded from the same period at Lake Mungo. However, the return to high water levels from 30 ka to 12 ka departs sharply from the generally accepted palaeoclimatic model from Australia, which demands severe glacial maximum desiccation and widespread construction of clay lunettes. Although hydrological budgets calculated for Lake Urana and nearby Lake Cullivel require high glacial maximum water levels they do not support higher precipitation. Copyright © 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Publication Date


  • 1994

Citation


  • Page, K., Dare‐Edwards, A., Nanson, G., & Price, D. (1994). Late Quaternary evolution of Lake Urana, New South Wales, Australia. Journal of Quaternary Science, 9(1), 47-57. doi:10.1002/jqs.3390090105

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0028254725

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 47

End Page


  • 57

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • Lake Urana is a well‐preserved relict lake in the semi‐arid Riverine Plain of southeastern Australia. A compound lunette at its eastern shoreline consists of a quartz‐sand‐dominated unit (Bimbadeen Formation), thermoluminescence (TL) dated at 30 ka to 12 ka, and a clay and sand facies unit (Coonong Formation), dated at 55 ka to 35 ka. The intervening period indicates a phase of periodically exposed lake floor and soil formation. The older wet phase conforms well with similar environments recorded from the same period at Lake Mungo. However, the return to high water levels from 30 ka to 12 ka departs sharply from the generally accepted palaeoclimatic model from Australia, which demands severe glacial maximum desiccation and widespread construction of clay lunettes. Although hydrological budgets calculated for Lake Urana and nearby Lake Cullivel require high glacial maximum water levels they do not support higher precipitation. Copyright © 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Publication Date


  • 1994

Citation


  • Page, K., Dare‐Edwards, A., Nanson, G., & Price, D. (1994). Late Quaternary evolution of Lake Urana, New South Wales, Australia. Journal of Quaternary Science, 9(1), 47-57. doi:10.1002/jqs.3390090105

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0028254725

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 47

End Page


  • 57

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 1