Skip to main content
placeholder image

An evidence-based approach to planning tobacco interventions for Aboriginal people.

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Systematic reviews have shown that interventions such as the delivery of cessation advice by heath professionals and the use of nicotine replacement therapy are effective at increasing cessation rates, however little is known about whether such interventions are appropriate and effective for and thus transferable to Aboriginal Australians. The aim of this paper was to assess whether evidence of effectiveness for brief interventions for cessation and nicotine patches from studies conducted in other populations was likely to be transferable to Aboriginal people in the NT. This paper involved assessment of systematic reviews of evidence for the use of brief interventions for smoking cessation and the use of nicotine replacement therapy, when planning two such interventions for delivery to Aboriginal people. Emerging themes are discussed. There were many factors which were likely to mean that these brief advice on cessation and the use of nicotine patches were likely to be less effective when implemented in Aboriginal communities. The planned interventions were delivered in primary care, and were of low intensity. Few studies included in systematic reviews were set in the developing world or in minority populations. Many features of the context for delivery, such as the normality of the use of tobacco among Aboriginal people, the low socio-economic status of this population and cultural issues, may have meant that these interventions were likely to be less effective when delivered in this setting. Further research is required to assess effectiveness of tobacco interventions in this population, as evidence from systematic reviews in other populations may not be directly transferable to Aboriginal people.

Publication Date


  • 2004

Citation


  • Ivers, R. G. (2004). An evidence-based approach to planning tobacco interventions for Aboriginal people.. Drug and alcohol review, 23(1), 5-9. doi:10.1080/09595230410001645501

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 5

End Page


  • 9

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • Systematic reviews have shown that interventions such as the delivery of cessation advice by heath professionals and the use of nicotine replacement therapy are effective at increasing cessation rates, however little is known about whether such interventions are appropriate and effective for and thus transferable to Aboriginal Australians. The aim of this paper was to assess whether evidence of effectiveness for brief interventions for cessation and nicotine patches from studies conducted in other populations was likely to be transferable to Aboriginal people in the NT. This paper involved assessment of systematic reviews of evidence for the use of brief interventions for smoking cessation and the use of nicotine replacement therapy, when planning two such interventions for delivery to Aboriginal people. Emerging themes are discussed. There were many factors which were likely to mean that these brief advice on cessation and the use of nicotine patches were likely to be less effective when implemented in Aboriginal communities. The planned interventions were delivered in primary care, and were of low intensity. Few studies included in systematic reviews were set in the developing world or in minority populations. Many features of the context for delivery, such as the normality of the use of tobacco among Aboriginal people, the low socio-economic status of this population and cultural issues, may have meant that these interventions were likely to be less effective when delivered in this setting. Further research is required to assess effectiveness of tobacco interventions in this population, as evidence from systematic reviews in other populations may not be directly transferable to Aboriginal people.

Publication Date


  • 2004

Citation


  • Ivers, R. G. (2004). An evidence-based approach to planning tobacco interventions for Aboriginal people.. Drug and alcohol review, 23(1), 5-9. doi:10.1080/09595230410001645501

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 5

End Page


  • 9

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 1