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Literacy and Curriculum: Language and Knowledge in the Classroom

Chapter


Abstract


  • This chapter outlines two distinct approaches to questions of literacy development and differentiation, one from the linguistic study of language features and the other from the sociological analysis of naturally occurring interactions. It draws attention both to the foundational, stable literacy resources that are recognizable across the curriculum areas, and to those resources that are specific to each curriculum domain. It is the growing specificity of the curriculum-specific resources that is central to the literacy-curriculum relationship, and therefore to our understanding of students' emerging use of language to understand experience and develop school knowledge. The bulk of the chapter is concerned with introducing interactional and linguistic approaches, summarizing some conceptual and empirical works in each, and illustrating key points with exhibits from classrooms. The chapter concludes by drawing out some directions for further research. �� 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd..

Publication Date


  • 2013

Edition


Citation


  • Freebody, P., Chan, E., & Barton, G. (2013). Literacy and Curriculum: Language and Knowledge in the Classroom. In International Handbook of Research on Children's Literacy, Learning, and Culture (pp. 304-318). doi:10.1002/9781118323342.ch22

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780470975978

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84886978579

Web Of Science Accession Number


Book Title


  • International Handbook of Research on Children's Literacy, Learning, and Culture

Start Page


  • 304

End Page


  • 318

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • This chapter outlines two distinct approaches to questions of literacy development and differentiation, one from the linguistic study of language features and the other from the sociological analysis of naturally occurring interactions. It draws attention both to the foundational, stable literacy resources that are recognizable across the curriculum areas, and to those resources that are specific to each curriculum domain. It is the growing specificity of the curriculum-specific resources that is central to the literacy-curriculum relationship, and therefore to our understanding of students' emerging use of language to understand experience and develop school knowledge. The bulk of the chapter is concerned with introducing interactional and linguistic approaches, summarizing some conceptual and empirical works in each, and illustrating key points with exhibits from classrooms. The chapter concludes by drawing out some directions for further research. �� 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd..

Publication Date


  • 2013

Edition


Citation


  • Freebody, P., Chan, E., & Barton, G. (2013). Literacy and Curriculum: Language and Knowledge in the Classroom. In International Handbook of Research on Children's Literacy, Learning, and Culture (pp. 304-318). doi:10.1002/9781118323342.ch22

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780470975978

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84886978579

Web Of Science Accession Number


Book Title


  • International Handbook of Research on Children's Literacy, Learning, and Culture

Start Page


  • 304

End Page


  • 318

Place Of Publication