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A co-produced cultural approach to workplace alcohol interventions: barriers and facilitators

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Background: There is increasing recognition that the workplace holds potential as an alcohol prevention/intervention setting. However, few robust studies of workplace interventions have been conducted. Research to-date has yielded mixed results. The current study aimed to address this knowledge gap by undertaking a process evaluation of the Workplace Alcohol Harm Reduction Project (WRAHP), a co-produced workplace alcohol intervention. Methods: A process evaluation was embedded within the WRAHP intervention trial. It included site visits (n = 41), site observations (N = 8) and on-site semi-structured key informant interviews (N = 50), conducted over the 3-year evaluation period. Results: A ���whole-of-workplace��� plus a ���co-production��� approach during intervention development and implementation contributed to uptake and sustainability. Seven potential barriers or facilitators emerged: (i) attitudes toward alcohol in the workplace, (ii) policy development and awareness, (iii) referral pathways and access to support, (iv) participation and equity: production pressure, (v) participation and equity: language barriers, (vi) communication and (vii) sustainability of the intervention. Conclusions: Embedding a tailored alcohol intervention within a ���worker-wellbeing��� framework promoted acceptance. This approach enabled barriers to be addressed whilst identifying facilitators of success. These results add to a growing evidence base regarding the value of interventions that target alcohol and support replication of similar co-produced interventions in other workplace settings.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Cameron, J., Pidd, K., Roche, A., Lee, N., & Jenner, L. (2019). A co-produced cultural approach to workplace alcohol interventions: barriers and facilitators. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, 26(5), 401-411. doi:10.1080/09687637.2018.1468871

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85047158657

Start Page


  • 401

End Page


  • 411

Volume


  • 26

Issue


  • 5

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Background: There is increasing recognition that the workplace holds potential as an alcohol prevention/intervention setting. However, few robust studies of workplace interventions have been conducted. Research to-date has yielded mixed results. The current study aimed to address this knowledge gap by undertaking a process evaluation of the Workplace Alcohol Harm Reduction Project (WRAHP), a co-produced workplace alcohol intervention. Methods: A process evaluation was embedded within the WRAHP intervention trial. It included site visits (n = 41), site observations (N = 8) and on-site semi-structured key informant interviews (N = 50), conducted over the 3-year evaluation period. Results: A ���whole-of-workplace��� plus a ���co-production��� approach during intervention development and implementation contributed to uptake and sustainability. Seven potential barriers or facilitators emerged: (i) attitudes toward alcohol in the workplace, (ii) policy development and awareness, (iii) referral pathways and access to support, (iv) participation and equity: production pressure, (v) participation and equity: language barriers, (vi) communication and (vii) sustainability of the intervention. Conclusions: Embedding a tailored alcohol intervention within a ���worker-wellbeing��� framework promoted acceptance. This approach enabled barriers to be addressed whilst identifying facilitators of success. These results add to a growing evidence base regarding the value of interventions that target alcohol and support replication of similar co-produced interventions in other workplace settings.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Cameron, J., Pidd, K., Roche, A., Lee, N., & Jenner, L. (2019). A co-produced cultural approach to workplace alcohol interventions: barriers and facilitators. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, 26(5), 401-411. doi:10.1080/09687637.2018.1468871

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85047158657

Start Page


  • 401

End Page


  • 411

Volume


  • 26

Issue


  • 5

Place Of Publication