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Human embryonic stem cells: Key characteristics and main applications in disease research

Chapter


Abstract


  • Embryonic stem cells (ESC), derived from the inner cell mass of pre-implantationmammalian embryos, are primordial, pluripotent cells capable of both self-renewal andfurther differentiation into the three primary germ lineages, ectoderm, endoderm, andmesoderm, which give rise to all cells types found within an adult organism. Onceestablished in culture, ESC lines can be propagated indefinitely without undergoing arestriction in developmental potential and thereby can provide an unlimited source ofcells for exploitation. Since ESC were first isolated from mouse blastocysts in 1981 [1],they have become a vital tool for the study of development and diseases. The derivationof human ESC (hESC) nearly twenty years later generated considerable interest andexcitement as researchers predicted their broad utility for human studies and cellulartherapies [2, 3]. Understanding the mechanisms that govern stem cell self-renewal anddifferentiation is of fundamental significance to cellular and developmental biology. Theknowledge gained from such research is anticipated to lead to major biomedicaloutcomes. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on hESCcharacterization, and will discuss the potential applications of hESC in disease research. © 2008 by Nova Science Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Davidsond, K. C., Dottori, M., & Pébay, A. (2008). Human embryonic stem cells: Key characteristics and main applications in disease research. In Stem Cell Applications in Diseases (pp. 155-188).

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781604562415

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84892331093

Web Of Science Accession Number


Book Title


  • Stem Cell Applications in Diseases

Start Page


  • 155

End Page


  • 188

Abstract


  • Embryonic stem cells (ESC), derived from the inner cell mass of pre-implantationmammalian embryos, are primordial, pluripotent cells capable of both self-renewal andfurther differentiation into the three primary germ lineages, ectoderm, endoderm, andmesoderm, which give rise to all cells types found within an adult organism. Onceestablished in culture, ESC lines can be propagated indefinitely without undergoing arestriction in developmental potential and thereby can provide an unlimited source ofcells for exploitation. Since ESC were first isolated from mouse blastocysts in 1981 [1],they have become a vital tool for the study of development and diseases. The derivationof human ESC (hESC) nearly twenty years later generated considerable interest andexcitement as researchers predicted their broad utility for human studies and cellulartherapies [2, 3]. Understanding the mechanisms that govern stem cell self-renewal anddifferentiation is of fundamental significance to cellular and developmental biology. Theknowledge gained from such research is anticipated to lead to major biomedicaloutcomes. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on hESCcharacterization, and will discuss the potential applications of hESC in disease research. © 2008 by Nova Science Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Davidsond, K. C., Dottori, M., & Pébay, A. (2008). Human embryonic stem cells: Key characteristics and main applications in disease research. In Stem Cell Applications in Diseases (pp. 155-188).

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781604562415

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84892331093

Web Of Science Accession Number


Book Title


  • Stem Cell Applications in Diseases

Start Page


  • 155

End Page


  • 188