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Human lens coloration and aging. Evidence for crystallin modification by the major ultraviolet filter, 3-hydroxy-kynurenine O-��-D-glucoside

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The human lens becomes increasingly yellow with age and thereby reduces our perception of blue light. This coloration is associated with lens proteins (crystallins), but its molecular basis was unknown. Here we show that the coloration occurs because of the interaction of crystallins with a UV filter compound, 3-hydroxykynurenine glucoside (3-OHKG). Crystallin modification results from deamination of the 3-OHKG amino acid side chain, yielding an unsaturated ketone that is susceptible to nucleophilic attack by cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues. This novel protein modification contributes to age-related lens coloration and may play a role in human nuclear cataractogenesis.

UOW Authors


  •   Garner, Brett (external author)
  •   Truscott, Roger

Publication Date


  • 1999

Citation


  • Hood, B. D., Garner, B., & Truscott, R. J. W. (1999). Human lens coloration and aging. Evidence for crystallin modification by the major ultraviolet filter, 3-hydroxy-kynurenine O-��-D-glucoside. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 274(46), 32547-32550. doi:10.1074/jbc.274.46.32547

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0032731157

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 32547

End Page


  • 32550

Volume


  • 274

Issue


  • 46

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • The human lens becomes increasingly yellow with age and thereby reduces our perception of blue light. This coloration is associated with lens proteins (crystallins), but its molecular basis was unknown. Here we show that the coloration occurs because of the interaction of crystallins with a UV filter compound, 3-hydroxykynurenine glucoside (3-OHKG). Crystallin modification results from deamination of the 3-OHKG amino acid side chain, yielding an unsaturated ketone that is susceptible to nucleophilic attack by cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues. This novel protein modification contributes to age-related lens coloration and may play a role in human nuclear cataractogenesis.

UOW Authors


  •   Garner, Brett (external author)
  •   Truscott, Roger

Publication Date


  • 1999

Citation


  • Hood, B. D., Garner, B., & Truscott, R. J. W. (1999). Human lens coloration and aging. Evidence for crystallin modification by the major ultraviolet filter, 3-hydroxy-kynurenine O-��-D-glucoside. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 274(46), 32547-32550. doi:10.1074/jbc.274.46.32547

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0032731157

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 32547

End Page


  • 32550

Volume


  • 274

Issue


  • 46

Place Of Publication