Skip to main content
placeholder image

Constructing places for the market: The case of Newcastle, NSW

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Cities with a heritage of heavy industry, such as Newcastle (NSW), face an insecure future as they undergo economic restructuring. The identities of cities are being refashioned by entrepreneurial urban governments, as part of a three-pronged attempt to market their territories. A social construction approach reveals the problematic nature of these symbolic reconstructions, their partiality, the reduction of heritage to a commodity, and the eliding of socio-economic disadvantage. The new post-industrial identity for Newcastle disinherits working people, ignores the local indigenous peoples, and trivialises the role of women. The richly layered urban landscape and historically constructed narratives - the local heritage - have been cynically appropriated and transformed for the purposes of place marketing. The rhetoric of post-industrialism conceals poverty and alienation, and the associated physical restructurings are displacing service-dependent populations. © 1996 Intellect Ltd.

Publication Date


  • 1996

Citation


  • Winchester, H. P. M., McGuirk, P. M., & Dunn, K. M. (1996). Constructing places for the market: The case of Newcastle, NSW. International Journal of Heritage Studies, 2(1-2), 41-58. doi:10.1080/13527259608722160

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-3843090270

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 41

End Page


  • 58

Volume


  • 2

Issue


  • 1-2

Abstract


  • Cities with a heritage of heavy industry, such as Newcastle (NSW), face an insecure future as they undergo economic restructuring. The identities of cities are being refashioned by entrepreneurial urban governments, as part of a three-pronged attempt to market their territories. A social construction approach reveals the problematic nature of these symbolic reconstructions, their partiality, the reduction of heritage to a commodity, and the eliding of socio-economic disadvantage. The new post-industrial identity for Newcastle disinherits working people, ignores the local indigenous peoples, and trivialises the role of women. The richly layered urban landscape and historically constructed narratives - the local heritage - have been cynically appropriated and transformed for the purposes of place marketing. The rhetoric of post-industrialism conceals poverty and alienation, and the associated physical restructurings are displacing service-dependent populations. © 1996 Intellect Ltd.

Publication Date


  • 1996

Citation


  • Winchester, H. P. M., McGuirk, P. M., & Dunn, K. M. (1996). Constructing places for the market: The case of Newcastle, NSW. International Journal of Heritage Studies, 2(1-2), 41-58. doi:10.1080/13527259608722160

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-3843090270

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 41

End Page


  • 58

Volume


  • 2

Issue


  • 1-2