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The genetics of schizophrenia

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The genetic analysis of schizophrenia has increasingly focused on localizing susceptibility genes. Converging evidence from linkage studies proposes some areas on the genome (5q, 6p, 6q, 8p, 10p, 13q, 18p and 22q) that may contain contributing genes. Replicated linkage signals are weak, however, as is the strength of the replicated associations with markers of candidate genes. Progress in the Human Genome Project, from improved clinical strategies to reduce complexity, and extension of informative family samples will aid future search for susceptibility genes. (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Publication Date


  • 2000

Citation


  • Maier, W., Schwab, S., & Rietschel, M. (2000). The genetics of schizophrenia. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 13(1), 3-9. doi:10.1097/00001504-200001000-00002

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0033978861

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 3

End Page


  • 9

Volume


  • 13

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • The genetic analysis of schizophrenia has increasingly focused on localizing susceptibility genes. Converging evidence from linkage studies proposes some areas on the genome (5q, 6p, 6q, 8p, 10p, 13q, 18p and 22q) that may contain contributing genes. Replicated linkage signals are weak, however, as is the strength of the replicated associations with markers of candidate genes. Progress in the Human Genome Project, from improved clinical strategies to reduce complexity, and extension of informative family samples will aid future search for susceptibility genes. (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Publication Date


  • 2000

Citation


  • Maier, W., Schwab, S., & Rietschel, M. (2000). The genetics of schizophrenia. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 13(1), 3-9. doi:10.1097/00001504-200001000-00002

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0033978861

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 3

End Page


  • 9

Volume


  • 13

Issue


  • 1