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No association between bipolar disorder and alleles at a functional polymorphism in the COMT gene. Biomed European Bipolar Collaborative Group.

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Background

    There is compelling evidence for the existence of susceptibility genes for bipolar disorder. Association studies using functional DNA variations are an important approach for identifying these genes. The enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) plays a key role in the degradation of catecholamine neurotransmitters and is a candidate for involvement in bipolar disorder. Recently a common functional genetic polymorphism that underlies population variation in COMT activity has been elucidated and a simple assay developed.

    Method

    In a collaboration involving seven European centres, we have undertaken an association study of this functional polymorphism in 412 unrelated West European caucasian DSM-III-R bipolar patients and 368 ethnically matched controls.

    Results

    We found no evidence of allelic or genotypic association.

    Conclusions

    We can conclude that variation at this functional polymorphism does not make an important contribution to bipolar disorder in the Western European population. Future studies using this powerful experimental approach can be expected to contribute to identification of bipolar susceptibility genes.

Publication Date


  • 1997

Citation


  • No association between bipolar disorder and alleles at a functional polymorphism in the COMT gene. Biomed European Bipolar Collaborative Group. (1997). The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science, 170, 526-528. doi:10.1192/bjp.170.6.526

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 526

End Page


  • 528

Volume


  • 170

Issue


Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Background

    There is compelling evidence for the existence of susceptibility genes for bipolar disorder. Association studies using functional DNA variations are an important approach for identifying these genes. The enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) plays a key role in the degradation of catecholamine neurotransmitters and is a candidate for involvement in bipolar disorder. Recently a common functional genetic polymorphism that underlies population variation in COMT activity has been elucidated and a simple assay developed.

    Method

    In a collaboration involving seven European centres, we have undertaken an association study of this functional polymorphism in 412 unrelated West European caucasian DSM-III-R bipolar patients and 368 ethnically matched controls.

    Results

    We found no evidence of allelic or genotypic association.

    Conclusions

    We can conclude that variation at this functional polymorphism does not make an important contribution to bipolar disorder in the Western European population. Future studies using this powerful experimental approach can be expected to contribute to identification of bipolar susceptibility genes.

Publication Date


  • 1997

Citation


  • No association between bipolar disorder and alleles at a functional polymorphism in the COMT gene. Biomed European Bipolar Collaborative Group. (1997). The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science, 170, 526-528. doi:10.1192/bjp.170.6.526

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 526

End Page


  • 528

Volume


  • 170

Issue


Place Of Publication