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Representations the questioning and answering in children's first school books

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Children's first school books contain a considerable amount the reported talk among characters in the stories. This is a central aspect the the characterization the these books as transitional from the conventions the oral language to the conventions the written prose, that is, as introductions to literacy. The nature the the written representation the conversation in such books has not previously been examined. This paper presents a partial analysis the this feature the beginning school readers, focussing on ���question-answer sequences.��� We show how these representations the talk compare with naturalistic research on child-adult interaction at home and in classrooms, and we propose that the model the child-adult talk portrayed in ���home��� and ���school��� scenes in the books appears to endorse some the the conventions for participation in instructional talk, and in this respect is implicitly a source the socialization into classroom culture. At the same time, we find that the texts give child speakers far more initiative in conversation than typically obtains in classroom talk, and this is seen also to be a feature the the social constitution the the child in these texts. Thus an image the childhood which combines conversational initiative and conversational competence as a member the the classroom community is conveyed. The paper also points out possible difficulties for child readers in interpreting the talk-on-paper, arising both from textual formats and from the particular version the the child as conversationalist which the books describe (Child-adult conversation, question-answer sequences, first school books, literacy acquisition). �� 1986, Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.

Publication Date


  • 1986

Citation


  • Baker, C. D., & Freebody, P. (1986). Representations the questioning and answering in children's first school books. Language in Society, 15(4), 451-483. doi:10.1017/S0047404500011970

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84974291794

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 451

End Page


  • 483

Volume


  • 15

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Children's first school books contain a considerable amount the reported talk among characters in the stories. This is a central aspect the the characterization the these books as transitional from the conventions the oral language to the conventions the written prose, that is, as introductions to literacy. The nature the the written representation the conversation in such books has not previously been examined. This paper presents a partial analysis the this feature the beginning school readers, focussing on ���question-answer sequences.��� We show how these representations the talk compare with naturalistic research on child-adult interaction at home and in classrooms, and we propose that the model the child-adult talk portrayed in ���home��� and ���school��� scenes in the books appears to endorse some the the conventions for participation in instructional talk, and in this respect is implicitly a source the socialization into classroom culture. At the same time, we find that the texts give child speakers far more initiative in conversation than typically obtains in classroom talk, and this is seen also to be a feature the the social constitution the the child in these texts. Thus an image the childhood which combines conversational initiative and conversational competence as a member the the classroom community is conveyed. The paper also points out possible difficulties for child readers in interpreting the talk-on-paper, arising both from textual formats and from the particular version the the child as conversationalist which the books describe (Child-adult conversation, question-answer sequences, first school books, literacy acquisition). �� 1986, Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.

Publication Date


  • 1986

Citation


  • Baker, C. D., & Freebody, P. (1986). Representations the questioning and answering in children's first school books. Language in Society, 15(4), 451-483. doi:10.1017/S0047404500011970

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84974291794

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 451

End Page


  • 483

Volume


  • 15

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication