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Duration of short-term indwelling cathetersg-A systematic review of the evidence

Journal Article


Abstract


  • OBJECTIVE: A systematic review on the effect of duration of catheterization on urinary retention. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Published and unpublished randomized and nonrandomized control trials from January 1966 to July 2004 comparing the effects of duration of catheterization on patient outcomes were systematically reviewed. Relative risks (RR) for dichotomous data and a weighted mean difference for continuous data were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where synthesis was inappropriate, a narrative overview was undertaken. RESULTS: Eight trials were included. Two trials on patients following urethrotomy demonstrated no statistically significant difference in the number of patients developing restenosis, epididymitis, or urethral pain at any follow-up periods. Two trials comparing removal of the indwelling urethral catheter within 24�����"48 hours to usual surgical criteria after transurethral surgery demonstrated no statistically significant difference in the number of patients requiring recatheterization. However, significant reduction in the length of hospitalization was reported after removal of the indwelling urethral catheter within 24�����"48 hours. An increased risk of urinary tract infection was found when the catheter was removed after 48 hours. Catheter removal on day 1 compared to day 3 after vaginal or retropubic surgery demonstrated no statistically significant difference in urinary retention or urinary tract infection. CONCLUSIONS: No significant differences in patient outcome were found, but the timing of catheter removal is a balance between avoiding infection by early removal and circumventing voiding dysfunction by later removal. Shorter catheterizations appear to reduce mean length of hospital stay. Copyright �� 2006 by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society.

Publication Date


  • 2006

Citation


  • Fernandez, R. S., & Griffiths, R. D. (2006). Duration of short-term indwelling cathetersg-A systematic review of the evidence. Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing, 33(2), 145-153. doi:10.1097/00152192-200603000-00008

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-33748431221

Start Page


  • 145

End Page


  • 153

Volume


  • 33

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • OBJECTIVE: A systematic review on the effect of duration of catheterization on urinary retention. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Published and unpublished randomized and nonrandomized control trials from January 1966 to July 2004 comparing the effects of duration of catheterization on patient outcomes were systematically reviewed. Relative risks (RR) for dichotomous data and a weighted mean difference for continuous data were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where synthesis was inappropriate, a narrative overview was undertaken. RESULTS: Eight trials were included. Two trials on patients following urethrotomy demonstrated no statistically significant difference in the number of patients developing restenosis, epididymitis, or urethral pain at any follow-up periods. Two trials comparing removal of the indwelling urethral catheter within 24�����"48 hours to usual surgical criteria after transurethral surgery demonstrated no statistically significant difference in the number of patients requiring recatheterization. However, significant reduction in the length of hospitalization was reported after removal of the indwelling urethral catheter within 24�����"48 hours. An increased risk of urinary tract infection was found when the catheter was removed after 48 hours. Catheter removal on day 1 compared to day 3 after vaginal or retropubic surgery demonstrated no statistically significant difference in urinary retention or urinary tract infection. CONCLUSIONS: No significant differences in patient outcome were found, but the timing of catheter removal is a balance between avoiding infection by early removal and circumventing voiding dysfunction by later removal. Shorter catheterizations appear to reduce mean length of hospital stay. Copyright �� 2006 by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society.

Publication Date


  • 2006

Citation


  • Fernandez, R. S., & Griffiths, R. D. (2006). Duration of short-term indwelling cathetersg-A systematic review of the evidence. Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing, 33(2), 145-153. doi:10.1097/00152192-200603000-00008

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-33748431221

Start Page


  • 145

End Page


  • 153

Volume


  • 33

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication